2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153849
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Sleep Patterns Following Cardiac Surgery
Abstract:
Sleep Patterns Following Cardiac Surgery
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2002
Conference Date:July, 2002
Author:Wimbush, Frances, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Wayne State University
Title:Assistant Professor
As many at 50% of clients who experience coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG) report at least short-term sleep disturbances post-procedure. The disruption in sleep and rest can have a profound effect on the client both physically and emotionally in addition to the serious nature of their illness and the recovery. This group was selected for study because they are exposed to many of the factors known to generate long-term insomnia, including a stressful and painful procedure and changes in sleep environment and daily routine. The procedure itself has been documented as having a major effect on the circadian rhythm, thus disturbing sleep-wake patterns. The purpose of the study is to explore the role of sleep beliefs and practices in the development and resolution of post-operative sleep problems in CABG clients. The theoretical/conceptual framework is investigator generated and was derived from retrospective studies of clients with insomnia. These studies suggest false beliefs misattribution and unrealistic expectations may play a role in development of chronic insomnia during times of stress. The methodology for the study is to have 60 elective CABG clients complete questionnaires related to their sleep patterns and beliefs pre-operatively and at 6 weeks and then monthly up to 6 months post procedure. At 6 weeks, the subjects receive instruction related to sleep hygiene (the effect of lifestyle choices on sleep; methods to promote sleep; methods to manage the environment). Subjects will serve at their own controls for changes in sleep beliefs and practices following instruction. Established scales are used to measure functional health, sleep quality, sleep beliefs and sleep hygiene awareness and practices. Descriptive and correlational analyses methods will be used. Preliminary results based on a comparison of pre-operative and 6-weeks data for 25 subjects indicate significance in several areas. The subjects thus far are predominantly Caucasian men from a mid-size Midwestern city. Other subject related results include a mean age of 64 years, average length of stay in the ICU of 21 hours, average time on the ventilator of 8.4 hours, average length of hospital stay of 6.7 days. The predominant secondary diagnosis was hypertension, with atrial fibrillation, angina, COPD, documented tobacco use, and diabetes, respectively in descending order. Data indicates a statistically significant change in 4 of the factors related to sleep history from pre-operative to 6 weeks (p<0.05). In addition, statistical significance was found pre-and post-operatively between: (a) time awake during the night; (b) need for regular sleep patterns; and, (c) knowledge related to sleep hygiene and sleep practices. Conclusions thus far indicate that members of this group of clients have begun to develop some symptoms of insomnia postoperatively. Insomnia becomes very difficult and expensive to manage if it becomes chronic. The results to date will be discussed in terms of their theoretical and practical significance for the management of short-term insomnia in CABG clients as well as the prevention of chronic insomnia. Nurses are in a unique position to educate, monitor and manage CABG clients for chronic insomnia as well as other aspects of their illness and treatment regimen. All nurses need to be aware of this aspect of holistic care for this group of clients.

Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jul-2002
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSleep Patterns Following Cardiac Surgeryen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153849-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Sleep Patterns Following Cardiac Surgery</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July, 2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Wimbush, Frances, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Wayne State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">f.wimbush@wayne.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">As many at 50% of clients who experience coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG) report at least short-term sleep disturbances post-procedure. The disruption in sleep and rest can have a profound effect on the client both physically and emotionally in addition to the serious nature of their illness and the recovery. This group was selected for study because they are exposed to many of the factors known to generate long-term insomnia, including a stressful and painful procedure and changes in sleep environment and daily routine. The procedure itself has been documented as having a major effect on the circadian rhythm, thus disturbing sleep-wake patterns. The purpose of the study is to explore the role of sleep beliefs and practices in the development and resolution of post-operative sleep problems in CABG clients. The theoretical/conceptual framework is investigator generated and was derived from retrospective studies of clients with insomnia. These studies suggest false beliefs misattribution and unrealistic expectations may play a role in development of chronic insomnia during times of stress. The methodology for the study is to have 60 elective CABG clients complete questionnaires related to their sleep patterns and beliefs pre-operatively and at 6 weeks and then monthly up to 6 months post procedure. At 6 weeks, the subjects receive instruction related to sleep hygiene (the effect of lifestyle choices on sleep; methods to promote sleep; methods to manage the environment). Subjects will serve at their own controls for changes in sleep beliefs and practices following instruction. Established scales are used to measure functional health, sleep quality, sleep beliefs and sleep hygiene awareness and practices. Descriptive and correlational analyses methods will be used. Preliminary results based on a comparison of pre-operative and 6-weeks data for 25 subjects indicate significance in several areas. The subjects thus far are predominantly Caucasian men from a mid-size Midwestern city. Other subject related results include a mean age of 64 years, average length of stay in the ICU of 21 hours, average time on the ventilator of 8.4 hours, average length of hospital stay of 6.7 days. The predominant secondary diagnosis was hypertension, with atrial fibrillation, angina, COPD, documented tobacco use, and diabetes, respectively in descending order. Data indicates a statistically significant change in 4 of the factors related to sleep history from pre-operative to 6 weeks (p&lt;0.05). In addition, statistical significance was found pre-and post-operatively between: (a) time awake during the night; (b) need for regular sleep patterns; and, (c) knowledge related to sleep hygiene and sleep practices. Conclusions thus far indicate that members of this group of clients have begun to develop some symptoms of insomnia postoperatively. Insomnia becomes very difficult and expensive to manage if it becomes chronic. The results to date will be discussed in terms of their theoretical and practical significance for the management of short-term insomnia in CABG clients as well as the prevention of chronic insomnia. Nurses are in a unique position to educate, monitor and manage CABG clients for chronic insomnia as well as other aspects of their illness and treatment regimen. All nurses need to be aware of this aspect of holistic care for this group of clients.<br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:33:40Z-
dc.date.issued2002-07en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:33:40Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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