Factors associated with clinical decision-making of students enrolled in generic baccalaureate nursing programs: Implications for program management and design

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153858
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Factors associated with clinical decision-making of students enrolled in generic baccalaureate nursing programs: Implications for program management and design
Abstract:
Factors associated with clinical decision-making of students enrolled in generic baccalaureate nursing programs: Implications for program management and design
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1992
Conference Date:August 6 - 8, 1992
Author:Grossman, Sheila, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Fairfield University
Title:Assistant Professor
This study investigated the relationships of variables that are associated with clinical decision-making ability using the nursing process. The variables selected include: age, critical thinking ability, previous years of health care experience, and general aptitude.



Seventy-five junior year students enrolled in three generic baccalaureate nursing programs in Connecticut constituted the sample for this study. Clinical decision-making ability was measured by Spark's Nursing Process Utilization Inventory which was revised by Polifroni and Scoloveno. Critical thinking ability was measured by the Watson-Glaser Critical Thinking Appraisal. The remaining independent variables were measured by a demographic questionnaire. Multiple regression analysis was utilized to determine a set of optimal predictors and to rank order each of the independent variables in terms of their capability of explaining variance in clinical decision-making ability of student nurses.



The findings of this research reveal: 1. Younger students have significantly higher clinical decision-making scores than older students. 2. Students with high aptitude ranks have significantly high clinical decision-making scores. 3. High critical thinking scores are significantly related to high clinical decision-making scores. 4. Work experience as a nurse aid or corp person is significantly related to high clinical decision-making ability. Licensed Practical Nurse experience is not significantly related. 5. Second-degree students have significantly higher clinical decision-making scores than those who do not have a previous baccalaureate degree. Scores of students transferred from other majors into the nursing program were not significantly related to high clinical decision making ability.



The results of this research are important for administrators of nursing programs. Students possessing any degree of the previously mentioned significant variables can be assisted to make a decision to enter nursing. Once admitted these students may attain clinical competency earlier and graduate in less time. Students not possessing these variables can be counseled to find work experience and to cultivate critical thinking and clinical decision-making.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
6-Aug-1992
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFactors associated with clinical decision-making of students enrolled in generic baccalaureate nursing programs: Implications for program management and designen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153858-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Factors associated with clinical decision-making of students enrolled in generic baccalaureate nursing programs: Implications for program management and design</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1992</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">August 6 - 8, 1992</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Grossman, Sheila, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Fairfield University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sheilacg@aol.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This study investigated the relationships of variables that are associated with clinical decision-making ability using the nursing process. The variables selected include: age, critical thinking ability, previous years of health care experience, and general aptitude.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Seventy-five junior year students enrolled in three generic baccalaureate nursing programs in Connecticut constituted the sample for this study. Clinical decision-making ability was measured by Spark's Nursing Process Utilization Inventory which was revised by Polifroni and Scoloveno. Critical thinking ability was measured by the Watson-Glaser Critical Thinking Appraisal. The remaining independent variables were measured by a demographic questionnaire. Multiple regression analysis was utilized to determine a set of optimal predictors and to rank order each of the independent variables in terms of their capability of explaining variance in clinical decision-making ability of student nurses.<br/><br/><br/><br/>The findings of this research reveal: 1. Younger students have significantly higher clinical decision-making scores than older students. 2. Students with high aptitude ranks have significantly high clinical decision-making scores. 3. High critical thinking scores are significantly related to high clinical decision-making scores. 4. Work experience as a nurse aid or corp person is significantly related to high clinical decision-making ability. Licensed Practical Nurse experience is not significantly related. 5. Second-degree students have significantly higher clinical decision-making scores than those who do not have a previous baccalaureate degree. Scores of students transferred from other majors into the nursing program were not significantly related to high clinical decision making ability.<br/><br/><br/><br/>The results of this research are important for administrators of nursing programs. Students possessing any degree of the previously mentioned significant variables can be assisted to make a decision to enter nursing. Once admitted these students may attain clinical competency earlier and graduate in less time. Students not possessing these variables can be counseled to find work experience and to cultivate critical thinking and clinical decision-making.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:34:02Z-
dc.date.issued1992-08-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:34:02Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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