2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153860
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Incontinence: Noninvasive nursing interventions
Abstract:
Incontinence: Noninvasive nursing interventions
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1992
Conference Date:August 6 - 8, 1992
Author:Pearson, Betty, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin-MilwaukeeSchool of Nursing
Title:Associate Professor
Supported by Grant R01 NRO 2908-01A1, NCNR, NIH



The purpose of this study was to test the 5 known confounding risk

factors of urinary incontinence, age, gender, medications, medical

diagnoses and environmental factors, and 13 remediable risk factors

(adequate liquids, adequate wait time after urge, sense full

bladder and urine flow, urination 5 to 8 times in 24 hours (1/

night), no dribbling of urine, able to stop and restart urine flow,

no burning urination, no bowel constipation or fecal incontinence,

normal vaginal lining, and involuntary loss of urine no more than

once a month). The remedial interventions were regular toileting,

pelvic floor muscle exercises, liquid intake of 1/2 ounce/pound of

body weight, and dietary supplements. The research question was:

What were the effects following the multiple noninvasive self

managed remedial interventions? The state of continence was

operationally defined as: continent no involuntary urine loss

during the past month; incontinent- involuntary loss of urine more

than once a month; and at-risk for loss of continence- experiencing

one or more risk factors. The method was a split group clinical

trial with a control group. Data were collected for 24 months.

The subjects (N=101, M age=79.8 years) were recruited from

residents dwelling in apartments or condominiums for elders. Of

those who began the first month of the study 25 dropped out.

Fifteen joined the study during month 13 and 6 of these dropped out

before month 18 with 9 completed. There were 72 subjects from

baseline through 12 months of interventions. Using Chi square to

test for equal distribution among the control group (n=38) and the

treatment group (n=63) and the t test for the continuous data no

significant differences were found among the subjects who remained

in the study and the dropouts for age, gender, medications (both

prescription and over the counter), use of diuretics and hypnotics,

type and number of medical diagnoses, smoking, environmental

features, and state of continence. The findings revealed that all

persons incontinent experienced at baseline from 4 to 10 risk

factors. Those experiencing multiple risk factors in most cases

received multiple remedies. To summarize the data on the 72 elders

is to note that 68 percent of the subjects met criteria or remedied

from 1 to 5 of the risk factors they had experienced during their

first 12 months in the study, another 18 percent experienced no

changes and 14 percent increased the number by 1 or 2 risk factors.

For all groups of subjects the number of risk factors was

significantly less 12 months after interventions. The 72 subjects

completing 12 monthly continence histories a M=3.39 number of risk

factors were experienced baseline and at 12 months M=2.19,

t(71)=7.12, p-.001. The 33 incontinent subjects baseline

experienced a M=4.18 factors and at 12 months M=2.74, t(32)=4.82,

p.=.0001. For the 37 subjects at-risk baseline a M=2.97 and at 12

months M=1.67, t(36)=5.59, p=.001. Of the 2 continent subjects one

experienced one (1) risk at month 12, t(1)=1, p=.5. Of the

subjects drinking adequate liquids none became incontinent. Of

these 72 subjects 2 were continent baseline and 10 were continent

the 12th month, 37 were at-risk baseline and 45 after 12 months,

and 33 were incontinent baseline and only 16 were incontinent month

12. The control group were not controls. Assessment is an

intervention itself.



Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
6-Aug-1992
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIncontinence: Noninvasive nursing interventionsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153860-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Incontinence: Noninvasive nursing interventions</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1992</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">August 6 - 8, 1992</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Pearson, Betty, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin-MilwaukeeSchool of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Supported by Grant R01 NRO 2908-01A1, NCNR, NIH<br/><br/><br/><br/>The purpose of this study was to test the 5 known confounding risk<br/><br/>factors of urinary incontinence, age, gender, medications, medical<br/><br/>diagnoses and environmental factors, and 13 remediable risk factors<br/><br/>(adequate liquids, adequate wait time after urge, sense full<br/><br/>bladder and urine flow, urination 5 to 8 times in 24 hours (1/<br/><br/>night), no dribbling of urine, able to stop and restart urine flow,<br/><br/>no burning urination, no bowel constipation or fecal incontinence,<br/><br/>normal vaginal lining, and involuntary loss of urine no more than<br/><br/>once a month). The remedial interventions were regular toileting,<br/><br/>pelvic floor muscle exercises, liquid intake of 1/2 ounce/pound of<br/><br/>body weight, and dietary supplements. The research question was:<br/><br/>What were the effects following the multiple noninvasive self<br/><br/>managed remedial interventions? The state of continence was<br/><br/>operationally defined as: continent no involuntary urine loss<br/><br/>during the past month; incontinent- involuntary loss of urine more<br/><br/>than once a month; and at-risk for loss of continence- experiencing<br/><br/>one or more risk factors. The method was a split group clinical<br/><br/>trial with a control group. Data were collected for 24 months.<br/><br/>The subjects (N=101, M age=79.8 years) were recruited from<br/><br/>residents dwelling in apartments or condominiums for elders. Of<br/><br/>those who began the first month of the study 25 dropped out.<br/><br/>Fifteen joined the study during month 13 and 6 of these dropped out<br/><br/>before month 18 with 9 completed. There were 72 subjects from<br/><br/>baseline through 12 months of interventions. Using Chi square to<br/><br/>test for equal distribution among the control group (n=38) and the<br/><br/>treatment group (n=63) and the t test for the continuous data no<br/><br/>significant differences were found among the subjects who remained<br/><br/>in the study and the dropouts for age, gender, medications (both<br/><br/>prescription and over the counter), use of diuretics and hypnotics,<br/><br/>type and number of medical diagnoses, smoking, environmental<br/><br/>features, and state of continence. The findings revealed that all<br/><br/>persons incontinent experienced at baseline from 4 to 10 risk<br/><br/>factors. Those experiencing multiple risk factors in most cases<br/><br/>received multiple remedies. To summarize the data on the 72 elders<br/><br/>is to note that 68 percent of the subjects met criteria or remedied<br/><br/>from 1 to 5 of the risk factors they had experienced during their<br/><br/>first 12 months in the study, another 18 percent experienced no<br/><br/>changes and 14 percent increased the number by 1 or 2 risk factors.<br/><br/>For all groups of subjects the number of risk factors was<br/><br/>significantly less 12 months after interventions. The 72 subjects<br/><br/>completing 12 monthly continence histories a M=3.39 number of risk<br/><br/>factors were experienced baseline and at 12 months M=2.19,<br/><br/>t(71)=7.12, p-.001. The 33 incontinent subjects baseline<br/><br/>experienced a M=4.18 factors and at 12 months M=2.74, t(32)=4.82,<br/><br/>p.=.0001. For the 37 subjects at-risk baseline a M=2.97 and at 12<br/><br/>months M=1.67, t(36)=5.59, p=.001. Of the 2 continent subjects one<br/><br/>experienced one (1) risk at month 12, t(1)=1, p=.5. Of the<br/><br/>subjects drinking adequate liquids none became incontinent. Of<br/><br/>these 72 subjects 2 were continent baseline and 10 were continent<br/><br/>the 12th month, 37 were at-risk baseline and 45 after 12 months,<br/><br/>and 33 were incontinent baseline and only 16 were incontinent month<br/><br/>12. The control group were not controls. Assessment is an<br/><br/>intervention itself.<br/><br/><br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:34:07Z-
dc.date.issued1992-08-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:34:07Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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