Prenatal psychosocial predictors of pregnancy adaptation and outcome in a multicultural, low-income population

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153862
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Prenatal psychosocial predictors of pregnancy adaptation and outcome in a multicultural, low-income population
Abstract:
Prenatal psychosocial predictors of pregnancy adaptation and outcome in a multicultural, low-income population
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1992
Conference Date:August 6 - 8, 1992
Author:Lederman, Regina, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Texas at Galveston
Title:Professor
Purpose. To determine the relationships among prenatal developmental and psychosocial variables that are predictive of pregnancy adaptation and delivery outcomes in a multicultural, low-income population.



Method. Subjects were 689 White, Black, and Hispanic English-speaking gravidas, 18-44 years old. Questionnaires completed in each trimester (delta) of pregnancy included the Beck Depression Inventory, the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, and the Lederman Prenatal Self-Evaluation Questionnaire measuring: Well-Being of Self/Baby (WELLBE), Acceptance of Pregnancy (ACCPREG), Identification of Motherhood Role (IDMORO), Preparation for Labor (PRELAB), Fears of Pain, Helplessness, and Loss of Control in Labor (HELP), Relationship to Mother (RELMOTH), and Relationship to Husband (RELHUS).



Results. Statistically significant results were found between primigravidas and multigravidas when the number of pregnancies was correlated with the following psychosocial scales: State Anxiety Scale in delta 3 (.12), WELLBE delta 2 (-.13), ACCPREG delta 3 (.19), PREPLAB delta l (-.47), PREPLAB delta 2 (-.42), PREPLAB delta 3 (-.29), HELP delta 2 (-.13), HELP delta 3 (-.16), RELMOTH delta 3 (.24). The results indicate that as parity increases, state anxiety and concerns about acceptance of the pregnancy and relationship with mother also increase, while fears concerning preparedness for labor and helplessness in labor decrease.



Significant correlations also were found between birthweight and several psychological scales and demographic variables including: Trait Anxiety Scale in delta 1 (-.18), IDMORO delta 3 (-.14), PREPLAB delta 2 (.17), Smoking During Pregnancy (-.17), and Drinking During Pregnancy (-.12). Controlling for the effects of race did not affect the magnitude or significance of these correlations. The results suggest that decreasing birthweight is associated with higher trait anxiety, poorer prenatal identification of a motherhood role, and greater smoking and drinking during pregnancy.



In summary, the findings indicate that prenatal developmental and psychosocial variables remain significant predictors of pregnancy adaptation and outcome. The findings can assist clinical nursing professionals in identifying gravidas prenatally who are at risk for non-acceptance of pregnancy and poor maternal role conceptualization.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
6-Aug-1992
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePrenatal psychosocial predictors of pregnancy adaptation and outcome in a multicultural, low-income populationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153862-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Prenatal psychosocial predictors of pregnancy adaptation and outcome in a multicultural, low-income population</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1992</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">August 6 - 8, 1992</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lederman, Regina, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Texas at Galveston</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rlederma@utmb.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose. To determine the relationships among prenatal developmental and psychosocial variables that are predictive of pregnancy adaptation and delivery outcomes in a multicultural, low-income population.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Method. Subjects were 689 White, Black, and Hispanic English-speaking gravidas, 18-44 years old. Questionnaires completed in each trimester (delta) of pregnancy included the Beck Depression Inventory, the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, and the Lederman Prenatal Self-Evaluation Questionnaire measuring: Well-Being of Self/Baby (WELLBE), Acceptance of Pregnancy (ACCPREG), Identification of Motherhood Role (IDMORO), Preparation for Labor (PRELAB), Fears of Pain, Helplessness, and Loss of Control in Labor (HELP), Relationship to Mother (RELMOTH), and Relationship to Husband (RELHUS).<br/><br/><br/><br/>Results. Statistically significant results were found between primigravidas and multigravidas when the number of pregnancies was correlated with the following psychosocial scales: State Anxiety Scale in delta 3 (.12), WELLBE delta 2 (-.13), ACCPREG delta 3 (.19), PREPLAB delta l (-.47), PREPLAB delta 2 (-.42), PREPLAB delta 3 (-.29), HELP delta 2 (-.13), HELP delta 3 (-.16), RELMOTH delta 3 (.24). The results indicate that as parity increases, state anxiety and concerns about acceptance of the pregnancy and relationship with mother also increase, while fears concerning preparedness for labor and helplessness in labor decrease.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Significant correlations also were found between birthweight and several psychological scales and demographic variables including: Trait Anxiety Scale in delta 1 (-.18), IDMORO delta 3 (-.14), PREPLAB delta 2 (.17), Smoking During Pregnancy (-.17), and Drinking During Pregnancy (-.12). Controlling for the effects of race did not affect the magnitude or significance of these correlations. The results suggest that decreasing birthweight is associated with higher trait anxiety, poorer prenatal identification of a motherhood role, and greater smoking and drinking during pregnancy.<br/><br/><br/><br/>In summary, the findings indicate that prenatal developmental and psychosocial variables remain significant predictors of pregnancy adaptation and outcome. The findings can assist clinical nursing professionals in identifying gravidas prenatally who are at risk for non-acceptance of pregnancy and poor maternal role conceptualization.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:34:13Z-
dc.date.issued1992-08-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:34:13Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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