2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153867
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Avian Influenza: Implications for Advanced Practice Nurses
Abstract:
Avian Influenza: Implications for Advanced Practice Nurses
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Wang, Ching-eng H., PhD, APRN
P.I. Institution Name:North Park University
Title:Associate Professor
The highly pathogenic avian influenza, or bird flu, has been a threat to bird populations worldwide since it was first identified in Italy more than 100 years ago.  As it evolves, the deadly virus, especially the H5N1 avian flu virus, has mutated to jump from birds to humans. The first documented human cases were diagnosed in Hong Kong in 1997. Since then, 138 human cases had been confirmed and 71 people had died in China, Cambodia, Indonesia, Thailand, and Viet Nam based on the World Health Organization?s (WHO) record. The primary route of human infection is from direct contact with infected birds or objected contaminated with its secretions and droppings. Although the avian flu virus does not have the ability to spread from human to human at present, the WHO warns that a pandemic of avian flu could occur in humans when this constantly mutating virus emerges as a novel subtype. Because of its deadly consequences, advanced practice nurses as primary health professionals must be aware of its signs and symptoms, diagnosis and treatment when encountering a suspected patient. Moreover, they must understand how to protect themselves and to prevent the spread of infection from this highly contagious virus.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAvian Influenza: Implications for Advanced Practice Nursesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153867-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Avian Influenza: Implications for Advanced Practice Nurses</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Wang, Ching-eng H., PhD, APRN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">North Park University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cwang@northpark.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The highly pathogenic avian influenza, or bird flu, has been a threat to bird populations worldwide since it was first identified in Italy more than 100 years ago.&nbsp; As it evolves, the deadly virus, especially the H5N1 avian flu virus, has mutated to jump from birds to humans. The first documented human cases were diagnosed in Hong Kong in 1997. Since then, 138 human cases had been confirmed and 71 people had died in China, Cambodia, Indonesia, Thailand, and Viet Nam based on the World Health Organization?s (WHO) record. The primary route of human infection is from direct contact with infected birds or objected contaminated with its secretions and droppings. Although the avian flu virus does not have the ability to spread from human to human at present, the WHO warns that a pandemic of avian flu could occur in humans when this constantly mutating virus emerges as a novel subtype. Because of its deadly consequences, advanced practice nurses as primary health professionals must be aware of its signs and symptoms, diagnosis and treatment when encountering a suspected patient. Moreover, they must understand how to protect themselves and to prevent the spread of infection from this highly contagious virus.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:34:25Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:34:25Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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