2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153875
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Understanding Women’s Quality of Life After Cardiac Events
Abstract:
Understanding Women’s Quality of Life After Cardiac Events
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Beckie, Theresa, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Uiversity of South Florida
Title:Assistant Professor
Objective: Quality of Life (QOL) has emerged as a focal concern in planning treatment for patients with cardiovascular disease yet confusion remains over the definition and measurement of this elusive concept. Coronary artery disease is the leading cause of death among North American women. Quality of life is presented as a global, yet unidimensional, subjective assessment of one’s satisfaction with life. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of perceived health status, hope, and dispositional optimism on quality of life in women who had suffered an acute cardiac event. Design: This study used a correlational research design. Sample and Setting: The sample consisted of 93 adult women from two west central Florida hospitals who had experienced an acute cardiac event. Concept: Quality of life was measured with the Faces Scale, the Life 3 scale, the Self Anchoring Striving Scale and the Multiple Discrepancies Theory questionnaire. Perceived health status was measured by eight dimensions of the SF-36 Health Survey and hope was measured with the Herth Hope Index. Dispositional optimism was measured with the Life Orientation Test. Methods: Prior to hospital discharge, the participants completed a variety of instruments for measuring quality of life and the other constructs. The validity and reliability of the indicators of global quality of life were examined by estimating a causal model in which quality of life was measured with four indicators derived from the literature. Structural equation modeling with LISREL was used to test the unidimensionality of global QOL indicators. Findings: The structural equation modeling process suggested the presence of a complex latent construct, tentatively called outlook, composed of hope and optimism that influenced quality of life. The causal modeling process revealed that the theoretical model was consistent with the data. The standardized effects of the concept called outlook (.415) and general health perceptions (.468) were substantial and significant predictors of quality of life. Implications: The challenge foe quality of life researchers continues to be: 1) to identify concepts that influence quality of life for particular patient populations in real life situations; and 2) to develop healthcare recommendations and guidelines regarding the concepts that produce positive influences on subjective quality of life. Before these challenges can be met, researchers and practitioners must state the meaning and place of quality of life in the real causal world rather than substituting often irrelevant surrogate concepts as proxy measures for it. Quality of life can be understood only when placed in a causal network of related concepts in the real world.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUnderstanding Women’s Quality of Life After Cardiac Eventsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153875-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Understanding Women&rsquo;s Quality of Life After Cardiac Events</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Beckie, Theresa, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Uiversity of South Florida</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">tbeckie@nurse.hsc.usf.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: Quality of Life (QOL) has emerged as a focal concern in planning treatment for patients with cardiovascular disease yet confusion remains over the definition and measurement of this elusive concept. Coronary artery disease is the leading cause of death among North American women. Quality of life is presented as a global, yet unidimensional, subjective assessment of one&rsquo;s satisfaction with life. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of perceived health status, hope, and dispositional optimism on quality of life in women who had suffered an acute cardiac event. Design: This study used a correlational research design. Sample and Setting: The sample consisted of 93 adult women from two west central Florida hospitals who had experienced an acute cardiac event. Concept: Quality of life was measured with the Faces Scale, the Life 3 scale, the Self Anchoring Striving Scale and the Multiple Discrepancies Theory questionnaire. Perceived health status was measured by eight dimensions of the SF-36 Health Survey and hope was measured with the Herth Hope Index. Dispositional optimism was measured with the Life Orientation Test. Methods: Prior to hospital discharge, the participants completed a variety of instruments for measuring quality of life and the other constructs. The validity and reliability of the indicators of global quality of life were examined by estimating a causal model in which quality of life was measured with four indicators derived from the literature. Structural equation modeling with LISREL was used to test the unidimensionality of global QOL indicators. Findings: The structural equation modeling process suggested the presence of a complex latent construct, tentatively called outlook, composed of hope and optimism that influenced quality of life. The causal modeling process revealed that the theoretical model was consistent with the data. The standardized effects of the concept called outlook (.415) and general health perceptions (.468) were substantial and significant predictors of quality of life. Implications: The challenge foe quality of life researchers continues to be: 1) to identify concepts that influence quality of life for particular patient populations in real life situations; and 2) to develop healthcare recommendations and guidelines regarding the concepts that produce positive influences on subjective quality of life. Before these challenges can be met, researchers and practitioners must state the meaning and place of quality of life in the real causal world rather than substituting often irrelevant surrogate concepts as proxy measures for it. Quality of life can be understood only when placed in a causal network of related concepts in the real world.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:34:46Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:34:46Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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