A Conundrum to be Explored: A Comparison of Two National Studies of Violence Related Content in Baccalaureate Nursing Programs in the United States

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153889
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Conundrum to be Explored: A Comparison of Two National Studies of Violence Related Content in Baccalaureate Nursing Programs in the United States
Abstract:
A Conundrum to be Explored: A Comparison of Two National Studies of Violence Related Content in Baccalaureate Nursing Programs in the United States
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Breslin, Eileen, DNS/DNSc/DSN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Massachusetts-Amherst
Title:Post-Doctoral Fellow
Objective: To compare the results of two descriptive national studies of baccalaureate and higher degree programs focused on violence related curricular content. Design: This study is a secondary analysis of two completed national studies (1995:1999) of violence related content in United States baccalaureate nursing programs. Conceptual Framework: The Ecological Model for Health Promotion (1988) served as a guiding framework for the development, conduct and analysis of both studies. The basic premise of the ecological model is that all behavior is influenced by five factors; intrapersonal, interpersonal, institutional, community and public policy. The ecological perspective implies a reciprocal causation between the individual and the environment. Sample: The 1995 national study, examined the extent, placement and faculty responsible for curricular content on abuse and violence against self, women, children and elders. Six hundred and twenty two National League for Nursing accredited baccalaureate and higher degree program were surveyed. Useable questionnaires constituted a 47% response rate. The 1999 national study revisited the same questions and the subsequent changes schools had made since the first survey. Six hundred and forty eight members of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing were surveyed. Useable questionnaires constituted a 63.5% response rate. Method: Both studies used a similar mailed questionnaire to query nursing programs about course content, clinical experiences, curriculum evaluation and recommendations regarding violence content in the curriculum. In both studies, quantitative data were analyzed using frequency and percents; qualitative data were content analyzed. Secondary data analysis used an interpretive method to search for similarities and differences in the findings of the two studies. The Ecological Model provided a framework from which to interpret findings. Findings: Demographic findings related to the description of nursing programs responding revealed that in 1999, a larger percentage of programs with enrollments <200 responded (67% versus 40%). The number of hours of course content hours related to child abuse, women abuse, elder and self-abuse were essentially similar for both studies. Despite the finding in the 1995 study that 44% of schools were undergoing curricular revisions, little systematic curricular planning related to violence was reported in 1999. Essential student competencies were not identified by a majority of survey respondents in either study. In the 1995 study, 27% of respondents provided ideas for strategies to be used for the curricular initiatives yet only 19% of respondents in 1999 study recommended specific strategies. Review of the strategies indicated varying support for the levels of interventions in the Ecological model. Conclusion: Findings indicate not much has changed in the interim between the two studies despite increased professional and public attention to the problem. Further, given that 73% of 1995 respondents and 81% of 1999 respondents chose not to comment on specific strategies for curriculum reform and student competencies, one must question the silence on the issue. Implications: The conundrum exists for nurse educators to explore, why do faculty remain essentially invisible in advocating for preparing students to provide expert care for individuals and families at risk or survivors of violence?
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Conundrum to be Explored: A Comparison of Two National Studies of Violence Related Content in Baccalaureate Nursing Programs in the United Statesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153889-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Conundrum to be Explored: A Comparison of Two National Studies of Violence Related Content in Baccalaureate Nursing Programs in the United States</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Breslin, Eileen, DNS/DNSc/DSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Massachusetts-Amherst</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Post-Doctoral Fellow</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">bresline@nursing.umass.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: To compare the results of two descriptive national studies of baccalaureate and higher degree programs focused on violence related curricular content. Design: This study is a secondary analysis of two completed national studies (1995:1999) of violence related content in United States baccalaureate nursing programs. Conceptual Framework: The Ecological Model for Health Promotion (1988) served as a guiding framework for the development, conduct and analysis of both studies. The basic premise of the ecological model is that all behavior is influenced by five factors; intrapersonal, interpersonal, institutional, community and public policy. The ecological perspective implies a reciprocal causation between the individual and the environment. Sample: The 1995 national study, examined the extent, placement and faculty responsible for curricular content on abuse and violence against self, women, children and elders. Six hundred and twenty two National League for Nursing accredited baccalaureate and higher degree program were surveyed. Useable questionnaires constituted a 47% response rate. The 1999 national study revisited the same questions and the subsequent changes schools had made since the first survey. Six hundred and forty eight members of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing were surveyed. Useable questionnaires constituted a 63.5% response rate. Method: Both studies used a similar mailed questionnaire to query nursing programs about course content, clinical experiences, curriculum evaluation and recommendations regarding violence content in the curriculum. In both studies, quantitative data were analyzed using frequency and percents; qualitative data were content analyzed. Secondary data analysis used an interpretive method to search for similarities and differences in the findings of the two studies. The Ecological Model provided a framework from which to interpret findings. Findings: Demographic findings related to the description of nursing programs responding revealed that in 1999, a larger percentage of programs with enrollments &lt;200 responded (67% versus 40%). The number of hours of course content hours related to child abuse, women abuse, elder and self-abuse were essentially similar for both studies. Despite the finding in the 1995 study that 44% of schools were undergoing curricular revisions, little systematic curricular planning related to violence was reported in 1999. Essential student competencies were not identified by a majority of survey respondents in either study. In the 1995 study, 27% of respondents provided ideas for strategies to be used for the curricular initiatives yet only 19% of respondents in 1999 study recommended specific strategies. Review of the strategies indicated varying support for the levels of interventions in the Ecological model. Conclusion: Findings indicate not much has changed in the interim between the two studies despite increased professional and public attention to the problem. Further, given that 73% of 1995 respondents and 81% of 1999 respondents chose not to comment on specific strategies for curriculum reform and student competencies, one must question the silence on the issue. Implications: The conundrum exists for nurse educators to explore, why do faculty remain essentially invisible in advocating for preparing students to provide expert care for individuals and families at risk or survivors of violence?</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:35:22Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:35:22Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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