World Survey of Nurse Associations and Unions: Common Concerns and Alternative Strategies

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153890
Type:
Presentation
Title:
World Survey of Nurse Associations and Unions: Common Concerns and Alternative Strategies
Abstract:
World Survey of Nurse Associations and Unions: Common Concerns and Alternative Strategies
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Clark, Darlene
P.I. Institution Name:Pennsylvania State University
Objectives--To identify employment-related problems RNs face worldwide as a result of changing health care delivery systems and the strategies nurse associations and unions employ to deal with these problems. Design--This is an exploratory study designed to gather descriptive information through a mail survey. Population, Sample, Setting, Years--Nurse associations and unions around the world (295 nurses associations and unions in 106 countries) will be asked to complete a questionnaire. The survey was mailed in the fall of 2000. Concepts or Variables Studied--Information will be gathered on the following employment-related issues: associations/unions membership levels (actual and percent of the nurse workforce), working conditions and patient care issues (understaffing, mandatory overtime, nurse safety and health concerns, etc.), job security and compensation, industrial relations issues (collective bargaining and nurse strikes), politics and public policy, and characteristics of the healthcare system. Methods--Information is being collected through a mail survey. The questionnaire was reviewed by representatives of the ICN and the PSI, as well as the American Nurses Association, the Service Employees International Union, the American Federation of State, County, and Municipal Employees, the American Federation of Teachers, the Royal College of Nursing, UNISON, and the New Zealand Nurses Organization. The questionnaire was prepared in three languages (English, French, and Spanish). A language-appropriate version was sent to the subject organizations. The results of the survey are being tabulated and analyzed. The results for various sub groups will be compared (unions v. associations; developed v. underdeveloped nations, etc.). Findings and Conclusions--Based on a review of the literature and interviews with nurse association and union leaders, we expect to find that patient care issues, particularly understaffing, ranks very high as a concern among nurse association and union members. In addition, we believe we will find that there is a nursing shortage in both developed and underdeveloped countries and that the problem in underdeveloped countries is exacerbated by the emigration of nurses to developed countries. We also expect to find great variance in the manner in which nurse organizations approach employment issues and that formal collective bargaining will be a phenomenon found more frequently in developed than in underdeveloped countries. Implications--We believe that the information gathered through this survey will be of great interest to nurses, nurse organizations, and nurse employers around the world. We believe further that sharing this information will provide evidence that nurse associations and unions around the world face similar problems. We also hope that the survey will suggest alternative strategies nurse organizations can employ to address the problems they face.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWorld Survey of Nurse Associations and Unions: Common Concerns and Alternative Strategiesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153890-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">World Survey of Nurse Associations and Unions: Common Concerns and Alternative Strategies</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Clark, Darlene</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Pennsylvania State University</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dac128@pau.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objectives--To identify employment-related problems RNs face worldwide as a result of changing health care delivery systems and the strategies nurse associations and unions employ to deal with these problems. Design--This is an exploratory study designed to gather descriptive information through a mail survey. Population, Sample, Setting, Years--Nurse associations and unions around the world (295 nurses associations and unions in 106 countries) will be asked to complete a questionnaire. The survey was mailed in the fall of 2000. Concepts or Variables Studied--Information will be gathered on the following employment-related issues: associations/unions membership levels (actual and percent of the nurse workforce), working conditions and patient care issues (understaffing, mandatory overtime, nurse safety and health concerns, etc.), job security and compensation, industrial relations issues (collective bargaining and nurse strikes), politics and public policy, and characteristics of the healthcare system. Methods--Information is being collected through a mail survey. The questionnaire was reviewed by representatives of the ICN and the PSI, as well as the American Nurses Association, the Service Employees International Union, the American Federation of State, County, and Municipal Employees, the American Federation of Teachers, the Royal College of Nursing, UNISON, and the New Zealand Nurses Organization. The questionnaire was prepared in three languages (English, French, and Spanish). A language-appropriate version was sent to the subject organizations. The results of the survey are being tabulated and analyzed. The results for various sub groups will be compared (unions v. associations; developed v. underdeveloped nations, etc.). Findings and Conclusions--Based on a review of the literature and interviews with nurse association and union leaders, we expect to find that patient care issues, particularly understaffing, ranks very high as a concern among nurse association and union members. In addition, we believe we will find that there is a nursing shortage in both developed and underdeveloped countries and that the problem in underdeveloped countries is exacerbated by the emigration of nurses to developed countries. We also expect to find great variance in the manner in which nurse organizations approach employment issues and that formal collective bargaining will be a phenomenon found more frequently in developed than in underdeveloped countries. Implications--We believe that the information gathered through this survey will be of great interest to nurses, nurse organizations, and nurse employers around the world. We believe further that sharing this information will provide evidence that nurse associations and unions around the world face similar problems. We also hope that the survey will suggest alternative strategies nurse organizations can employ to address the problems they face.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:35:25Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:35:25Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.