Internet Use, Needs, and Receptivity to Nursing Support in Fathers of Special Needs Children

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153891
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Internet Use, Needs, and Receptivity to Nursing Support in Fathers of Special Needs Children
Abstract:
Internet Use, Needs, and Receptivity to Nursing Support in Fathers of Special Needs Children
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Ekstrom, David
P.I. Institution Name:Pace University
Objective: This is preliminary research for a larger project that will explore the experience of fathers of children with special needs while providing nurse-mediated education and support via the Internet. Specific objectives for this pilot study are to gather baseline data about this understudied population and to continue development of the Internet Use and Needs Questionnaire (IUNQ). Design: This is a descriptive survey employing a mailed questionnaire. Population, Sample, Setting: The sample (N = 90) is being recruited in equal numbers from fathers of special needs children in three categories, simple mental retardation/developmental disability (e.g., Down Syndrome); complex disability (e.g., Cerebral Palsy); and chronic illness (e.g., Cystic Fibrosis). Participants are being recruited by word of mouth and also from agencies that serve the special needs population in and around a large metropolitan area in the Northeastern United States. Concepts: The 65 items of the IUNQ were derived from a review of the literature, speaking with families of children with special needs, and from personal experience. Content validity was established by expert panel review, and the instrument was pre-tested during previous phases of this project. The IUNQ has two parts: “Information about you and your family,” consisting of multiple choice and simple fill in questions and “Your experiences and opinions about support services,” a Likert scale. Conceptual areas addressed are needs (emotional support, information about the disability, and practical information), concerns (what does the father worry about?), computer and Internet use (ability to use, access, and current usage), receptivity to support in general, receptivity to computer-mediated support, receptivity to nurse support, and demographics/general information. Method: Questionnaires are being distributed in person by project members, e.g., at agency family meetings, and to fathers referred by word of mouth. All questionnaires are returned anonymously by mail. Descriptive analyses of the data will be conducted, as well as comparisons among the three special needs categories. Additional analyses related to reliability and validity of the IUNQ will also be conducted. Findings: Preliminary descriptive statistics, reliability, and factor analysis are presented. Implications: The roles of mothers and fathers of special needs children are complex and time intensive. The extent of fathers’ participation and reaction to their roles is particularly under investigated. Developing a system of education and support via the Internet for these fathers, facilitated by an Advanced Practice Nurse, would serve the dual purpose of providing them with care and finding out more about them. This pilot study will provide essential baseline information that will help to determine the larger project’s feasibility and to guide its planning and implementation. Additionally, having a valid and reliable instrument tailored to this population will allow tracking of outcomes of this innovative nursing intervention over time.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleInternet Use, Needs, and Receptivity to Nursing Support in Fathers of Special Needs Childrenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153891-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Internet Use, Needs, and Receptivity to Nursing Support in Fathers of Special Needs Children</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ekstrom, David</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Pace University</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dekstrom@pace.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: This is preliminary research for a larger project that will explore the experience of fathers of children with special needs while providing nurse-mediated education and support via the Internet. Specific objectives for this pilot study are to gather baseline data about this understudied population and to continue development of the Internet Use and Needs Questionnaire (IUNQ). Design: This is a descriptive survey employing a mailed questionnaire. Population, Sample, Setting: The sample (N = 90) is being recruited in equal numbers from fathers of special needs children in three categories, simple mental retardation/developmental disability (e.g., Down Syndrome); complex disability (e.g., Cerebral Palsy); and chronic illness (e.g., Cystic Fibrosis). Participants are being recruited by word of mouth and also from agencies that serve the special needs population in and around a large metropolitan area in the Northeastern United States. Concepts: The 65 items of the IUNQ were derived from a review of the literature, speaking with families of children with special needs, and from personal experience. Content validity was established by expert panel review, and the instrument was pre-tested during previous phases of this project. The IUNQ has two parts: &ldquo;Information about you and your family,&rdquo; consisting of multiple choice and simple fill in questions and &ldquo;Your experiences and opinions about support services,&rdquo; a Likert scale. Conceptual areas addressed are needs (emotional support, information about the disability, and practical information), concerns (what does the father worry about?), computer and Internet use (ability to use, access, and current usage), receptivity to support in general, receptivity to computer-mediated support, receptivity to nurse support, and demographics/general information. Method: Questionnaires are being distributed in person by project members, e.g., at agency family meetings, and to fathers referred by word of mouth. All questionnaires are returned anonymously by mail. Descriptive analyses of the data will be conducted, as well as comparisons among the three special needs categories. Additional analyses related to reliability and validity of the IUNQ will also be conducted. Findings: Preliminary descriptive statistics, reliability, and factor analysis are presented. Implications: The roles of mothers and fathers of special needs children are complex and time intensive. The extent of fathers&rsquo; participation and reaction to their roles is particularly under investigated. Developing a system of education and support via the Internet for these fathers, facilitated by an Advanced Practice Nurse, would serve the dual purpose of providing them with care and finding out more about them. This pilot study will provide essential baseline information that will help to determine the larger project&rsquo;s feasibility and to guide its planning and implementation. Additionally, having a valid and reliable instrument tailored to this population will allow tracking of outcomes of this innovative nursing intervention over time.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:35:28Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:35:28Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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