2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153892
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Preserving Protective Factors Against Drug Use Among Youth, Ages 10-15 Years
Abstract:
Preserving Protective Factors Against Drug Use Among Youth, Ages 10-15 Years
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Erickson, Julie, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Arizona
Title:Associate Professor
Objective: Delaying the onset of alcohol, tobacco and other drug (ATD) use is a common goal for prevention programs targeting youth. Data suggest that as youth age, intentions to not use and negative attitudes toward use decay. Younger youth report higher refusal skills, stronger intent not to use, more negative opinions about use by peers, higher perceived harm associated with use and less actual use then youth just a few years older. It is reasonable to hypothesize that preserving high levels of these protective factors as a child ages may delay onset or stop initial use. This research examined the effects of the SMART Moves Program on 1) preserving levels of protective factors and 2) actual ATD use. Design: A prospective, longitudinal design was used. Data were collected prior to, at completion of and six months after completion of a component of the SMART Moves Program. Alpha was .05. Sample, Setting, Years: A non-random sample of youth, 10-15 years, were recruited from a rural community and Native American reservation in Arizona. Data collection began in 2000. Most youth were female (59%). Median age was 11 years. Youth self-identified as Hispanic (41%), Native American (38%), Anglo (9%) or other (12%). Variables, Intervention and Outcomes: Protective factors included attitudes towards alcohol, cigarettes, and marijuana use; drug knowledge, ATD refusal skills; and, social skills. Youth participated in an after school program, using the SMART Moves curriculum, a national prevention program of the Boys and Girls Club. Youth were assigned to one of three program components based on age. ATD use in the last seven and last 30 days were self-reported. Methods: A self-report survey, developed by Penn State University in collaboration with the Boys and Girls Clubs of America, was used. Reliability was adequate for protective factors. Findings: Baseline data showed significant correlations between age and negative attitudes toward alcohol use (r=-.31) and marijuana use (r=-.28) as well as age and refusal skills (r=-.22). Prior to intervention, scores on four of six protective factors were high. Use in the last 30 days was reported by 2% for alcohol and cigarettes but 7% for marijuana. After completion of a component, age no longer correlated with marijuana attitudes or refusal skills. Wilcoxon Matched-Pairs found only one significant change across time, social skills increased significantly (p=.008). Reported use in the last 30 days increased slightly for alcohol (3%), cigarettes, (10%) and marijuana (10%). Conclusions: SMART Moves preserves high levels of protective factors across short periods of time and maintains rare use of drugs. Longer-term effects, as youth age in years, must be examined. Implications: A reasonable approach to delaying onset or stopping first ATD use may include examining protective factors that youth bring into a program and working to maintain those levels.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePreserving Protective Factors Against Drug Use Among Youth, Ages 10-15 Yearsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153892-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Preserving Protective Factors Against Drug Use Among Youth, Ages 10-15 Years</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Erickson, Julie, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Arizona</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">erickson@nursing.arizona.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: Delaying the onset of alcohol, tobacco and other drug (ATD) use is a common goal for prevention programs targeting youth. Data suggest that as youth age, intentions to not use and negative attitudes toward use decay. Younger youth report higher refusal skills, stronger intent not to use, more negative opinions about use by peers, higher perceived harm associated with use and less actual use then youth just a few years older. It is reasonable to hypothesize that preserving high levels of these protective factors as a child ages may delay onset or stop initial use. This research examined the effects of the SMART Moves Program on 1) preserving levels of protective factors and 2) actual ATD use. Design: A prospective, longitudinal design was used. Data were collected prior to, at completion of and six months after completion of a component of the SMART Moves Program. Alpha was .05. Sample, Setting, Years: A non-random sample of youth, 10-15 years, were recruited from a rural community and Native American reservation in Arizona. Data collection began in 2000. Most youth were female (59%). Median age was 11 years. Youth self-identified as Hispanic (41%), Native American (38%), Anglo (9%) or other (12%). Variables, Intervention and Outcomes: Protective factors included attitudes towards alcohol, cigarettes, and marijuana use; drug knowledge, ATD refusal skills; and, social skills. Youth participated in an after school program, using the SMART Moves curriculum, a national prevention program of the Boys and Girls Club. Youth were assigned to one of three program components based on age. ATD use in the last seven and last 30 days were self-reported. Methods: A self-report survey, developed by Penn State University in collaboration with the Boys and Girls Clubs of America, was used. Reliability was adequate for protective factors. Findings: Baseline data showed significant correlations between age and negative attitudes toward alcohol use (r=-.31) and marijuana use (r=-.28) as well as age and refusal skills (r=-.22). Prior to intervention, scores on four of six protective factors were high. Use in the last 30 days was reported by 2% for alcohol and cigarettes but 7% for marijuana. After completion of a component, age no longer correlated with marijuana attitudes or refusal skills. Wilcoxon Matched-Pairs found only one significant change across time, social skills increased significantly (p=.008). Reported use in the last 30 days increased slightly for alcohol (3%), cigarettes, (10%) and marijuana (10%). Conclusions: SMART Moves preserves high levels of protective factors across short periods of time and maintains rare use of drugs. Longer-term effects, as youth age in years, must be examined. Implications: A reasonable approach to delaying onset or stopping first ATD use may include examining protective factors that youth bring into a program and working to maintain those levels.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:35:31Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:35:31Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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