Legislative Decision Making and Health Policy: A Phenomenological Study of State Legislators and Individual Decision Making

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153897
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Legislative Decision Making and Health Policy: A Phenomenological Study of State Legislators and Individual Decision Making
Abstract:
Legislative Decision Making and Health Policy: A Phenomenological Study of State Legislators and Individual Decision Making
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Kerschner, Sarah
P.I. Institution Name:Vermont Department of Health
Objective: To formulate a phenomenological description of the essential structure of individual decision making in issues of health policy as revealed by state legislators. Design: Phenomenological in-depth interviews. Population/Sample/Setting: Four Vermont state legislators were interviewed in the spring of 2000. All four were members of the House or Senate Health and Welfare committees. Two were senators, two were representatives. Three were Democrats, one was Republican. The interviews took place in the participants’ home, offices, or the Statehouse. Methods: The interview process used the phenomenological method as described by Streubert. The transcripts were reviewed and themes identified and maneuvered in an iterative process until a description of the essential structure emerged. The exhaustive summary was returned to the participants for validation. Findings: Three essential elements to form the essential structure of individual legislative decision making on issues of health policy. The first essential element that of understanding the issue, was described via the themes of listening and learning about the issue. The second essential element, shaping a personal stand, was described as critically evaluating the issue to forma personal opinion. The third element, weighing for action, was revealed through themes of evaluating alternatives to choose which strategies to consider and pursue. Influences which affect decision-making were grouped into eight categories: Prominence, values, constituents, life experience, source of information, respected colleague, time, and political process. Conclusions: The essential structure of individual legislative decision-making in issues of health policy was revealed to contain three essential elements with specific themes and influences. More study is needed to examine the effects of values and life experience as influences on individual legislative decision making, especially concentrating on the element of shaping a personal stand. Implications: The findings offer guidance for nurses in planning approaches to legislators when advocating for specific health issues. As nurses work to influence the development of health policy, they may be more effective by developing strategies to work with the described essential structure of decision-making.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLegislative Decision Making and Health Policy: A Phenomenological Study of State Legislators and Individual Decision Makingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153897-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Legislative Decision Making and Health Policy: A Phenomenological Study of State Legislators and Individual Decision Making</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kerschner, Sarah</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Vermont Department of Health</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kirsch@together.net</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: To formulate a phenomenological description of the essential structure of individual decision making in issues of health policy as revealed by state legislators. Design: Phenomenological in-depth interviews. Population/Sample/Setting: Four Vermont state legislators were interviewed in the spring of 2000. All four were members of the House or Senate Health and Welfare committees. Two were senators, two were representatives. Three were Democrats, one was Republican. The interviews took place in the participants&rsquo; home, offices, or the Statehouse. Methods: The interview process used the phenomenological method as described by Streubert. The transcripts were reviewed and themes identified and maneuvered in an iterative process until a description of the essential structure emerged. The exhaustive summary was returned to the participants for validation. Findings: Three essential elements to form the essential structure of individual legislative decision making on issues of health policy. The first essential element that of understanding the issue, was described via the themes of listening and learning about the issue. The second essential element, shaping a personal stand, was described as critically evaluating the issue to forma personal opinion. The third element, weighing for action, was revealed through themes of evaluating alternatives to choose which strategies to consider and pursue. Influences which affect decision-making were grouped into eight categories: Prominence, values, constituents, life experience, source of information, respected colleague, time, and political process. Conclusions: The essential structure of individual legislative decision-making in issues of health policy was revealed to contain three essential elements with specific themes and influences. More study is needed to examine the effects of values and life experience as influences on individual legislative decision making, especially concentrating on the element of shaping a personal stand. Implications: The findings offer guidance for nurses in planning approaches to legislators when advocating for specific health issues. As nurses work to influence the development of health policy, they may be more effective by developing strategies to work with the described essential structure of decision-making.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:35:44Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:35:44Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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