Willingness to Serve Underserved and Disenfranchised Populations: The Influence of Level of Education and Demographic Characteristics of Community Health Nurses

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153901
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Willingness to Serve Underserved and Disenfranchised Populations: The Influence of Level of Education and Demographic Characteristics of Community Health Nurses
Abstract:
Willingness to Serve Underserved and Disenfranchised Populations: The Influence of Level of Education and Demographic Characteristics of Community Health Nurses
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Spalding, Claudette M., PhD, ARNP
P.I. Institution Name:Barry University
Title:Assistant Professor and Associate Dean Graduate Program
Co-Authors:Jessie M. Colin, PhD, RN
Background: Health care professionals are called upon to serve a variety of populations, including underserved and disenfranchised groups. Recently there have been emerging professional forums addressing the health and social needs of previously ignored or neglected groups; emphasis by researchers, healthcare professionals, governments, and funding agencies to determine health disparities and their causes; and the National Institute of Nursing Research has identified health disparities research as a primary focus. Research addressing the willingness to serve previously ignored or neglected groups has been limited. The purpose of this study was twofold: 1. to identify relationships between select demographic variables (i.e., age, gender), educational variables, and community health nurses' willingness to serve underserved and disenfranchised populations; 2. to specify the relative contributions of (a) select demographic variables and (b) level of education on community health nurses' willingness to serve underserved and disenfranchised populations. Method: A cross-sectional survey design was used. Data for the study was obtained through an anonymous survey at various community and home health centers throughout three counties in the southeast United States. The survey consisted of (a) demographic questionnaire with items addressing personal background and educational variables, and (b) a 50-item willingness to serve underserved and disenfranchised populations instrument (Spalding, 2002) which assessed the willingness of participants to deliver services to or provide care for members of 50 different populations or groups. Findings: Data analysis consisted of (a) exploratory data analysis, (b) reliability estimates, (c) descriptive statistics and tests for group differences for demographic variables, and (d) descriptive statistics for major study variables as well as individual instrument items. Study hypotheses were tested using bivariate correlations and multiple regression techniques. Conclusions: This presentation will discuss this study's results and identify potential strategies which may ultimately lead to tailored interventions to increase sensitivity and openness to working with marginalized groups.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWillingness to Serve Underserved and Disenfranchised Populations: The Influence of Level of Education and Demographic Characteristics of Community Health Nursesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153901-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Willingness to Serve Underserved and Disenfranchised Populations: The Influence of Level of Education and Demographic Characteristics of Community Health Nurses</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Spalding, Claudette M., PhD, ARNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Barry University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor and Associate Dean Graduate Program</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cspalding@mail.barry.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Jessie M. Colin, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Health care professionals are called upon to serve a variety of populations, including underserved and disenfranchised groups. Recently there have been emerging professional forums addressing the health and social needs of previously ignored or neglected groups; emphasis by researchers, healthcare professionals, governments, and funding agencies to determine health disparities and their causes; and the National Institute of Nursing Research has identified health disparities research as a primary focus. Research addressing the willingness to serve previously ignored or neglected groups has been limited. The purpose of this study was twofold: 1. to identify relationships between select demographic variables (i.e., age, gender), educational variables, and community health nurses' willingness to serve underserved and disenfranchised populations; 2. to specify the relative contributions of (a) select demographic variables and (b) level of education on community health nurses' willingness to serve underserved and disenfranchised populations. Method: A cross-sectional survey design was used. Data for the study was obtained through an anonymous survey at various community and home health centers throughout three counties in the southeast United States. The survey consisted of (a) demographic questionnaire with items addressing personal background and educational variables, and (b) a 50-item willingness to serve underserved and disenfranchised populations instrument (Spalding, 2002) which assessed the willingness of participants to deliver services to or provide care for members of 50 different populations or groups. Findings: Data analysis consisted of (a) exploratory data analysis, (b) reliability estimates, (c) descriptive statistics and tests for group differences for demographic variables, and (d) descriptive statistics for major study variables as well as individual instrument items. Study hypotheses were tested using bivariate correlations and multiple regression techniques. Conclusions: This presentation will discuss this study's results and identify potential strategies which may ultimately lead to tailored interventions to increase sensitivity and openness to working with marginalized groups.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:35:54Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:35:54Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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