2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153910
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Meaning of a Good Death: A Taiwanese Perspective
Abstract:
The Meaning of a Good Death: A Taiwanese Perspective
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Lu, Chu-Yun
P.I. Institution Name:Pennsylvania State University
Objective: To explore the meaning of a good death from the perspectives of Taiwanese hospice nurses. Design: The research design used in this study was hermeneutic phenomenology. In phenomenology, the in-depth narratives of participants in response to a general or broad question provide the data for analysis and interpretation. Additional questions asked by the researcher come from the narratives of the participants. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: The participants of the study were Taiwanese hospice nurses who worked either in hospital-based or home care in Taiwan. Eight participants were interviewed to elicit their concepts of a good death. These interviews were conducted from June 1999 to August 1999. Concept or Variables Studied Together or Intervention and Outcome Variables: The philosophy of hospice care is experiencing a good death through achieving quality of life during the terminal phase. Therefore, understanding Taiwanese hospice nurses’ concepts of a good death will assist in developing quality of life that fits with dying Taiwanese hospice patients’ cultural perspectives. Methods: In-depth interviews were used to collect the hospice nurses’ experiences of a good death. Transcriptions and interpretations were returned to participants to verify their accuracy because being translated into English. Findings: The concept of a good death that emerged from the narratives of the hospice nurses included three stages: preparing for death, the last moment of dying, and bereavement. In the first stage, the patient and family prepare fir the death by supporting a comfortable lifetime for the patient. This includes symptom control and marinating the patient’s bodily functions. In the second stages, the patient and family are well prepared for the last moment of dying, including a natural death: the patient passes away, and the family does not feel regret after the death because the patient’s wishes have been met. After the death, the memory of a well prepared for death helps the family to soothe the pain of their loss and reenergizes hospice nurses to care for other patients and families; this is the third stage. Conclusions: A good death is not just something that happens at the moment of death, but also is a process and an outcome among those who are the living and the dying. To achieve a good death requires that people work together, including the patient, family, and the hospice team, especially the hospice nurse. Implications: Nursing is a profession of caring. The broad definition of caring is total care, including physical, psychosocial, and spiritual care. Also, the relationship between nurse and patient could be a tool to help the patient achieve a quality of life that is in accord with his or her cultural and religious beliefs.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Meaning of a Good Death: A Taiwanese Perspectiveen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153910-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Meaning of a Good Death: A Taiwanese Perspective</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lu, Chu-Yun</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Pennsylvania State University</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cxl349@psu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: To explore the meaning of a good death from the perspectives of Taiwanese hospice nurses. Design: The research design used in this study was hermeneutic phenomenology. In phenomenology, the in-depth narratives of participants in response to a general or broad question provide the data for analysis and interpretation. Additional questions asked by the researcher come from the narratives of the participants. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: The participants of the study were Taiwanese hospice nurses who worked either in hospital-based or home care in Taiwan. Eight participants were interviewed to elicit their concepts of a good death. These interviews were conducted from June 1999 to August 1999. Concept or Variables Studied Together or Intervention and Outcome Variables: The philosophy of hospice care is experiencing a good death through achieving quality of life during the terminal phase. Therefore, understanding Taiwanese hospice nurses&rsquo; concepts of a good death will assist in developing quality of life that fits with dying Taiwanese hospice patients&rsquo; cultural perspectives. Methods: In-depth interviews were used to collect the hospice nurses&rsquo; experiences of a good death. Transcriptions and interpretations were returned to participants to verify their accuracy because being translated into English. Findings: The concept of a good death that emerged from the narratives of the hospice nurses included three stages: preparing for death, the last moment of dying, and bereavement. In the first stage, the patient and family prepare fir the death by supporting a comfortable lifetime for the patient. This includes symptom control and marinating the patient&rsquo;s bodily functions. In the second stages, the patient and family are well prepared for the last moment of dying, including a natural death: the patient passes away, and the family does not feel regret after the death because the patient&rsquo;s wishes have been met. After the death, the memory of a well prepared for death helps the family to soothe the pain of their loss and reenergizes hospice nurses to care for other patients and families; this is the third stage. Conclusions: A good death is not just something that happens at the moment of death, but also is a process and an outcome among those who are the living and the dying. To achieve a good death requires that people work together, including the patient, family, and the hospice team, especially the hospice nurse. Implications: Nursing is a profession of caring. The broad definition of caring is total care, including physical, psychosocial, and spiritual care. Also, the relationship between nurse and patient could be a tool to help the patient achieve a quality of life that is in accord with his or her cultural and religious beliefs.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:36:18Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:36:18Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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