Actual and Ideal Nursing Role Conceptions: Australian 1st Year RNs Experiences

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153911
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Actual and Ideal Nursing Role Conceptions: Australian 1st Year RNs Experiences
Abstract:
Actual and Ideal Nursing Role Conceptions: Australian 1st Year RNs Experiences
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Marriott, Rhonda
P.I. Institution Name:Edith Cowan University
Role conceptions have been explored in nursing and other professions as a way to explain the complexity of the professional role. The successful transition from student to registered nurse requires a period of socialization so an adjustment to the differences between school and the real world demands of the professional role can successfully occur. During socialization, the registered nurse refines their knowledge, skills and sense of professional identity. The transition time is marked by a transformation of the registered nurse’s thoughts and expectations of the role, that is the ideal role conceptions, into a reality of the role, that is, actual role conceptions. Changes in the registered nurse’s personal and professional behaviors will be influenced by positive or negative feelings arising from their workplace experiences. The anticipated transition outcomes are a registered nurse who experiences congruency with the organization in which they are working and who demonstrates professional, role-appropriate behaviors. Much of the earlier work about role conceptions and their impact on the individual took place in North America in the 1970’s. Little is known of Australian nurses’ beliefs and experiences. The purpose of this study was to identify the presence or absence of disparity between ideal and actual nursing role conceptions in a group of Western Australia registered nurses, and to identify factors in their early career experiences, which may be associated with nursing role conception disparity. The descriptive study sampled 61, first year registered nurses who were graduates from tertiary, nursing programs and practicing in Western Australia at the time of study. Descriptive and inferential statistics were applied to answer the research questions and the results were strengthened by qualitative analysis of open-ended responses. The sample completed a 34 item, self-report instrument that incorporated an adaptation of Mary Fitch’s (1989) “Nurse Role Conception” questionnaire to identify total and sub-scale mean scores of three aspects of ideal and actual nursing role conceptions – professional, bureaucratic and service. The instrument included researcher-developed items on early career experiences identified as important in the literature. The results conclude that disparity was present in the study sample, with 24.5% experiencing reality shock (a term used by Marlene Kramer in the 1970s). The degree of reality shock experienced in the Western Australian sample was similar to the North American sample in Kramer’s 1974 study – yet there is two decades between the two studies. All three nursing role conception sub-scale mean scores were statistically significant (p=0.01) for disparity with the service nursing role conception having the greatest mean sub-scale score. A number of significant correlations were found between disparity and early career experiences. Graduate programs were not identified as a statistically significant early career experience with nursing role conception disparity. However, networks and role models were significant. Of greatest significance was the relationship between nursing role conception disparity and the intention to remain in the nursing profession. Eleven point five percent of the sample indicated uncertainty about remaining in nursing; and 4.9% indicated no intention in remaining. The findings strengthen the need for further research into effective strategies to smooth the transition from the student to registered nurse role, and to improve retention of registered nurses in the workplace. Previously recommended and implemented strategies of graduate programs and preceptorship do not appear to have resolved the situation.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleActual and Ideal Nursing Role Conceptions: Australian 1st Year RNs Experiencesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153911-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Actual and Ideal Nursing Role Conceptions: Australian 1st Year RNs Experiences</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Marriott, Rhonda</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Edith Cowan University</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">r.marriott@cowan.edu.au</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Role conceptions have been explored in nursing and other professions as a way to explain the complexity of the professional role. The successful transition from student to registered nurse requires a period of socialization so an adjustment to the differences between school and the real world demands of the professional role can successfully occur. During socialization, the registered nurse refines their knowledge, skills and sense of professional identity. The transition time is marked by a transformation of the registered nurse&rsquo;s thoughts and expectations of the role, that is the ideal role conceptions, into a reality of the role, that is, actual role conceptions. Changes in the registered nurse&rsquo;s personal and professional behaviors will be influenced by positive or negative feelings arising from their workplace experiences. The anticipated transition outcomes are a registered nurse who experiences congruency with the organization in which they are working and who demonstrates professional, role-appropriate behaviors. Much of the earlier work about role conceptions and their impact on the individual took place in North America in the 1970&rsquo;s. Little is known of Australian nurses&rsquo; beliefs and experiences. The purpose of this study was to identify the presence or absence of disparity between ideal and actual nursing role conceptions in a group of Western Australia registered nurses, and to identify factors in their early career experiences, which may be associated with nursing role conception disparity. The descriptive study sampled 61, first year registered nurses who were graduates from tertiary, nursing programs and practicing in Western Australia at the time of study. Descriptive and inferential statistics were applied to answer the research questions and the results were strengthened by qualitative analysis of open-ended responses. The sample completed a 34 item, self-report instrument that incorporated an adaptation of Mary Fitch&rsquo;s (1989) &ldquo;Nurse Role Conception&rdquo; questionnaire to identify total and sub-scale mean scores of three aspects of ideal and actual nursing role conceptions &ndash; professional, bureaucratic and service. The instrument included researcher-developed items on early career experiences identified as important in the literature. The results conclude that disparity was present in the study sample, with 24.5% experiencing reality shock (a term used by Marlene Kramer in the 1970s). The degree of reality shock experienced in the Western Australian sample was similar to the North American sample in Kramer&rsquo;s 1974 study &ndash; yet there is two decades between the two studies. All three nursing role conception sub-scale mean scores were statistically significant (p=0.01) for disparity with the service nursing role conception having the greatest mean sub-scale score. A number of significant correlations were found between disparity and early career experiences. Graduate programs were not identified as a statistically significant early career experience with nursing role conception disparity. However, networks and role models were significant. Of greatest significance was the relationship between nursing role conception disparity and the intention to remain in the nursing profession. Eleven point five percent of the sample indicated uncertainty about remaining in nursing; and 4.9% indicated no intention in remaining. The findings strengthen the need for further research into effective strategies to smooth the transition from the student to registered nurse role, and to improve retention of registered nurses in the workplace. Previously recommended and implemented strategies of graduate programs and preceptorship do not appear to have resolved the situation.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:36:20Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:36:20Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.