2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153913
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Use of the BIS Monitor Does not Decrease Wake Up or Recovery Room Times
Abstract:
Use of the BIS Monitor Does not Decrease Wake Up or Recovery Room Times
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Perine, Diane
Introduction: The use of the Bispectral Index Monitor (BIS) as a tool for cost savings remains controversial. Objective: this study was designed to evaluate whether routine use of the BIS can influence time in the operating room or time in the recovery phase of anesthesia. Methods: After institutional approval, 78 patients ASA category I-III undergoing elective outpatient procedures were enrolled and randomly assigned to one of two groups: Group I, those blinded to the BIS and Group II, those with the BIS, respectively. All anesthesia providers participating in this study had been trained by Aspect Medical in the use of the BIS and had at least six months experience with the monitor. All patients received a standardized anesthetic consisting of midazolam, propofol, succinylcholine, fentanyl, nitrous oxide and isoflurane. Doses of all drugs and the use of intraoperative muscle relaxants and reveral agents were at the discretion of the anesthesia provider. Pre-induction and post-surgical BIS scores were recorded for each subject. Outcome Variables: Immediately following surgical closure, the subjects were repeatedly given a random motor command with the time to a correct response noted (TUAR). The recovery room nurse, blinded to the study group, scored the subject on arrival with the Observers Assessment of Alertness Scale (OAA/S. [1] The length of time from admission to the recovery room until the subject met recovery room discharge criteria was noted (TIRR). Findings: Data are presented as mean +/-S.D. Statistical analysis was done using analysis of variance with the Tukey-Kramer correction with differences being significant for p<0.05. There were no statistical differences in age, ASA, sex, height, weight or length of procedure between Group I and Group II. Results indicated for the BIS vs. Non-BIS groups the values for TUAR, OAA/S, and TIRR were respectively: TUAR (5.4 +/-3.1 vs. 5.3+/-3.2 min), OAA/S (4.2+/-0.7 vs. 3.9+/-0.8), and TIRR (66+/-33 vs. 70+/-35 min). None of these differences proved statistically significant. Conclusions: Use of the BIS does not improve performance with respect to time to awakening from general anesthesia, initial alertness in the recovery room, or time to achieving recovery room discharge criteria and therefore, is not cost effective with respect to time savings when employed routinely.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUse of the BIS Monitor Does not Decrease Wake Up or Recovery Room Timesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153913-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Use of the BIS Monitor Does not Decrease Wake Up or Recovery Room Times</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Perine, Diane</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">todi4choc@aol.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Introduction: The use of the Bispectral Index Monitor (BIS) as a tool for cost savings remains controversial. Objective: this study was designed to evaluate whether routine use of the BIS can influence time in the operating room or time in the recovery phase of anesthesia. Methods: After institutional approval, 78 patients ASA category I-III undergoing elective outpatient procedures were enrolled and randomly assigned to one of two groups: Group I, those blinded to the BIS and Group II, those with the BIS, respectively. All anesthesia providers participating in this study had been trained by Aspect Medical in the use of the BIS and had at least six months experience with the monitor. All patients received a standardized anesthetic consisting of midazolam, propofol, succinylcholine, fentanyl, nitrous oxide and isoflurane. Doses of all drugs and the use of intraoperative muscle relaxants and reveral agents were at the discretion of the anesthesia provider. Pre-induction and post-surgical BIS scores were recorded for each subject. Outcome Variables: Immediately following surgical closure, the subjects were repeatedly given a random motor command with the time to a correct response noted (TUAR). The recovery room nurse, blinded to the study group, scored the subject on arrival with the Observers Assessment of Alertness Scale (OAA/S. [1] The length of time from admission to the recovery room until the subject met recovery room discharge criteria was noted (TIRR). Findings: Data are presented as mean +/-S.D. Statistical analysis was done using analysis of variance with the Tukey-Kramer correction with differences being significant for p&lt;0.05. There were no statistical differences in age, ASA, sex, height, weight or length of procedure between Group I and Group II. Results indicated for the BIS vs. Non-BIS groups the values for TUAR, OAA/S, and TIRR were respectively: TUAR (5.4 +/-3.1 vs. 5.3+/-3.2 min), OAA/S (4.2+/-0.7 vs. 3.9+/-0.8), and TIRR (66+/-33 vs. 70+/-35 min). None of these differences proved statistically significant. Conclusions: Use of the BIS does not improve performance with respect to time to awakening from general anesthesia, initial alertness in the recovery room, or time to achieving recovery room discharge criteria and therefore, is not cost effective with respect to time savings when employed routinely.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:36:25Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:36:25Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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