Daytime Sleepiness and Sleep Symptoms of Mexican-Americans and Mexicans: A Binational Comparative Study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153967
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Daytime Sleepiness and Sleep Symptoms of Mexican-Americans and Mexicans: A Binational Comparative Study
Abstract:
Daytime Sleepiness and Sleep Symptoms of Mexican-Americans and Mexicans: A Binational Comparative Study
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2011
Author:Baldwin, Carol M., PhD, RN, AHN-BC, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:Arizona State University
Title:Associate Professor
Co-Authors:Darya McClain PhD, Research Associate Professor
Manuela Vital MSN, RN, ANP, International EBP Coordinator
Angela Chia-Chen Chen PhD, RN, PMHNP-BC, Assistant Professor
Cipriana Caudillo-Cisneros RN, MS, Directora
Sergio Marquez-Gamino, MD, PhD, Professor
L
[22nd International Nursing Research Congress - Research Presentation] Purpose: Daytime sleepiness often results from night-time sleep problems, including insomnia and sleep apnea. The Epworth Sleepiness Scale is the most commonly used subjective measure of daytime sleepiness in clinical and research settings. This bi-national study is a first step at examining Epworth scores and sleep disorders of Mexican Americans and Mexicans in order to developing culturally and regionally responsive sleep education and interventions. Methods: Mexican Americans (N=204; 56% women) and Mexicans (N=202; 53% women) provided demographic and sleep data derived from the Spanish-translated NIH NHLBI Sleep Heart Health Study Sleep Habits Questionnaire (SHQ) that included the Epworth. Data were analyzed using frequencies, chi-squared tests and analysis of variance with PASWv18.
Results: Mexican Americans compared to Mexicans were older (40.5 +/- 13.5 versus 36.9 +/-13.2 years, p<0.05), less likely to be insured (45.6% versus 80.7%, p<0.001), and more likely to earn over $5K/year (74% versus 98.5%, p<0.001). Both groups indicated approximately 10 years of education. Mexican Americans reported more insomnia symptoms (37.3% versus 27.8%, p<0.05), while Mexicans reported feeling unrested (30.7% versus 22.5%, p<0.01) and sleepier during the day (16.8% versus 10.7%, p<0.01) on the SHQ. Mean Epworth scores did not differ between groups; however, Mexican Americans were more likely to report 'resting in the afternoon' compared to Mexicans (51.9% versus 38.1%, p<0.01) with a trend for dozing while watching TV (42.1% to 31.2%, p<0.10). Mexican Americans also reported more drowsy driving (4.4% versus 1.5%, p<0.10).
Conclusion: Although they earn more than Mexicans, lack of insurance and education are significant access to care issues for Mexican Americans. Higher rates for insomnia symptoms (difficulty with sleep onset and maintenance) may contribute to Mexican Americanss higher afternoon 'siesta' and drowsy driving rates. Findings underscore the need for 'immigration health' training for providers, and culturally relevant sleep education and interventions in nursing practice and research bi-nationally.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDaytime Sleepiness and Sleep Symptoms of Mexican-Americans and Mexicans: A Binational Comparative Studyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153967-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Daytime Sleepiness and Sleep Symptoms of Mexican-Americans and Mexicans: A Binational Comparative Study</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2011</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Baldwin, Carol M., PhD, RN, AHN-BC, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Arizona State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">carol.baldwin@asu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Darya McClain PhD, Research Associate Professor<br/>Manuela Vital MSN, RN, ANP, International EBP Coordinator<br/>Angela Chia-Chen Chen PhD, RN, PMHNP-BC, Assistant Professor<br/>Cipriana Caudillo-Cisneros RN, MS, Directora<br/>Sergio Marquez-Gamino, MD, PhD, Professor<br/>L</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[22nd International Nursing Research Congress - Research Presentation] Purpose:&nbsp;Daytime sleepiness often results from night-time sleep problems, including insomnia and sleep apnea. The Epworth Sleepiness Scale is the most commonly used subjective measure of daytime sleepiness in clinical and research settings. This bi-national study is a first step at examining Epworth scores and sleep disorders of Mexican Americans and Mexicans in order to developing culturally and regionally responsive sleep education and interventions. Methods:&nbsp;Mexican Americans (N=204; 56% women) and Mexicans (N=202; 53% women) provided demographic and sleep data derived from the Spanish-translated NIH NHLBI Sleep Heart Health Study Sleep Habits Questionnaire (SHQ) that included the Epworth. Data were analyzed using frequencies, chi-squared tests and analysis of variance with PASWv18. <br/>Results:&nbsp;Mexican Americans compared to Mexicans were older (40.5 +/- 13.5 versus 36.9 +/-13.2 years, p&lt;0.05), less likely to be insured (45.6% versus 80.7%, p&lt;0.001), and more likely to earn over $5K/year (74% versus 98.5%, p&lt;0.001). Both groups indicated approximately 10 years of education. Mexican Americans reported more insomnia symptoms (37.3% versus 27.8%, p&lt;0.05), while Mexicans reported feeling unrested (30.7% versus 22.5%, p&lt;0.01) and sleepier during the day (16.8% versus 10.7%, p&lt;0.01) on the SHQ. Mean Epworth scores did not differ between groups; however, Mexican Americans were more likely to report 'resting in the afternoon' compared to Mexicans (51.9% versus 38.1%, p&lt;0.01) with a trend for dozing while watching TV (42.1% to 31.2%, p&lt;0.10). Mexican Americans also reported more drowsy driving (4.4% versus 1.5%, p&lt;0.10). <br/>Conclusion:&nbsp;Although they earn more than Mexicans, lack of insurance and education are significant access to care issues for Mexican Americans. Higher rates for insomnia symptoms (difficulty with sleep onset and maintenance) may contribute to Mexican Americanss higher afternoon 'siesta' and drowsy driving rates. Findings underscore the need for 'immigration health' training for providers, and culturally relevant sleep education and interventions in nursing practice and research bi-nationally.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:38:44Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:38:44Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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