A New Graduate RN Residency Program to Improve Clinical Competency and Socialization Skills of Novice Nurses

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/153986
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A New Graduate RN Residency Program to Improve Clinical Competency and Socialization Skills of Novice Nurses
Abstract:
A New Graduate RN Residency Program to Improve Clinical Competency and Socialization Skills of Novice Nurses
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2010
Author:Kim, Kimberly, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:California State University, East Bay
Title:Associate Professor of Nursing
21st INRC [Research Presentation] Purpose: This presentation aims to describe the transition experiences of new graduate nurses who are currently enrolled in the New Graduate RN Residency Program and examine the level of clinical competency skills and socialization factors related to the transition experience. Methods: This ongoing descriptive repeated measures study will assess the acquisition of clinical competency skills such as accountability, professional role behaviors, safety, time management and socialization of 200 culturally diverse new graduate nurses enrolled in the New Graduate RN Residency Program at a northern California State University. The preliminary data have been collected using questionnaires and open-ended qualitative questions in post-baccalaureate seminar courses before and after the New Graduate RN Residency Program. This regionally-based collaborative residency project is designed to offer 12 weeks of additional clinical experience for participants in order to transition successfully into the workforce. The regional collaborative partners include 11 acute care hospitals, three long term care facilities, three community and tele-health clinics, and two workforce investment boards in the Bay area. Results: After completion of the residency program, we expect a minimum of 160 new RNs will secure unsubsidized employment and retain the jobs for at least a year after hiring. Data will be analyzed using descriptive statistics to evaluate accountability, professional role behaviors, and socialization components of the clinical competency skills in new graduate nurses. Pearson product moment correlation coefficients will be used to measure the relationship between the levels of professional role behaviors and socialization components of the clinical competency skills. Conclusion: The residency program facilitates the transition of critical period between education and competent practice where the novice nurse experiences practice and receives support from competent nurses in order to develop professionally and improve socialization skills.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA New Graduate RN Residency Program to Improve Clinical Competency and Socialization Skills of Novice Nursesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/153986-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A New Graduate RN Residency Program to Improve Clinical Competency and Socialization Skills of Novice Nurses</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kim, Kimberly, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">California State University, East Bay</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kimberly.kim@csueastbay.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">21st INRC [Research Presentation] Purpose: This presentation aims to describe the transition experiences of new graduate nurses who are currently enrolled in the New Graduate RN Residency Program and examine the level of clinical competency skills and socialization factors related to the transition experience. Methods: This ongoing descriptive repeated measures study will assess the acquisition of clinical competency skills such as accountability, professional role behaviors, safety, time management and socialization of 200 culturally diverse new graduate nurses enrolled in the New Graduate RN Residency Program at a northern California State University. The preliminary data have been collected using questionnaires and open-ended qualitative questions in post-baccalaureate seminar courses before and after the New Graduate RN Residency Program. This regionally-based collaborative residency project is designed to offer 12 weeks of additional clinical experience for participants in order to transition successfully into the workforce. The regional collaborative partners include 11 acute care hospitals, three long term care facilities, three community and tele-health clinics, and two workforce investment boards in the Bay area. Results: After completion of the residency program, we expect a minimum of 160 new RNs will secure unsubsidized employment and retain the jobs for at least a year after hiring. Data will be analyzed using descriptive statistics to evaluate accountability, professional role behaviors, and socialization components of the clinical competency skills in new graduate nurses. Pearson product moment correlation coefficients will be used to measure the relationship between the levels of professional role behaviors and socialization components of the clinical competency skills. Conclusion: The residency program facilitates the transition of critical period between education and competent practice where the novice nurse experiences practice and receives support from competent nurses in order to develop professionally and improve socialization skills.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:39:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:39:35Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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