2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154060
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Global Aging in Caregiving: A Model of Dyadic Caregiving across Cultures
Abstract:
Global Aging in Caregiving: A Model of Dyadic Caregiving across Cultures
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2008
Author:Blume, Nancy, PhD, RN, BC, ARNP-CNS
P.I. Institution Name:Lamar University
Title:Director, Graduate Nursing Studies
[Research Paper or Poster Presentation] The purpose of this study was to develop a model for spousal dyadic caregiving useful across cultures. Spousal dyadic caregivers from rural Midwestern America (N= 28) and Native American caregivers from two different tribes (N=21) were assessed for common caregiver strengths. A model of caregiver strengths to empower at-home spousal caregivers of Alzheimer's and Dementia persons was developed through a path analytic approach that determined a goodness of fit statistic with a model that fitted the data (r squared, F test, p=.05). Significant paths were: P21 (.563) Compassion to Finding Meaning, P42 (.485) Finding Meaning to Sense of Coherence. Data were collected through a Heritage Strengths survey, Finding Meaning in Caregiving scale, Coping Inventory and Antonovsky's Sense of Coherence scale. Spousal dyads were assessed separately for outcomes. Connectedness to resources (both internal and external) was found to have a positive association with caregiver and care recipient (dyads) well-being. (r= .83, r=.87). There was a positive direct relationship between number of resources used successfully and caregiver and care recipient outcomes. The data revealed a useful model from varying cultures based on caregiving strengths in dyadic caregiving. Respect for the past or ôCultural compassionö was identified as a common strength.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleGlobal Aging in Caregiving: A Model of Dyadic Caregiving across Culturesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154060-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Global Aging in Caregiving: A Model of Dyadic Caregiving across Cultures</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2008</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Blume, Nancy, PhD, RN, BC, ARNP-CNS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Lamar University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Director, Graduate Nursing Studies</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Nancy.Blume@lamar.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Research Paper or Poster Presentation] The purpose of this study was to develop a model for spousal dyadic caregiving useful across cultures. Spousal dyadic caregivers from rural Midwestern America (N= 28) and Native American caregivers from two different tribes (N=21) were assessed for common caregiver strengths. A model of caregiver strengths to empower at-home spousal caregivers of Alzheimer's and Dementia persons was developed through a path analytic approach that determined a goodness of fit statistic with a model that fitted the data (r squared, F test, p=.05). Significant paths were: P21 (.563) Compassion to Finding Meaning, P42 (.485) Finding Meaning to Sense of Coherence. Data were collected through a Heritage Strengths survey, Finding Meaning in Caregiving scale, Coping Inventory and Antonovsky's Sense of Coherence scale. Spousal dyads were assessed separately for outcomes. Connectedness to resources (both internal and external) was found to have a positive association with caregiver and care recipient (dyads) well-being. (r= .83, r=.87). There was a positive direct relationship between number of resources used successfully and caregiver and care recipient outcomes. The data revealed a useful model from varying cultures based on caregiving strengths in dyadic caregiving. Respect for the past or &ocirc;Cultural compassion&ouml; was identified as a common strength.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:42:51Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:42:51Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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