Aggressiveness of Nursing Care Intentions for the End-of-Life Client: A 20-Year Follow-Up Study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154149
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Aggressiveness of Nursing Care Intentions for the End-of-Life Client: A 20-Year Follow-Up Study
Abstract:
Aggressiveness of Nursing Care Intentions for the End-of-Life Client: A 20-Year Follow-Up Study
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2009
Author:Bennett, Mary P., PhD, ARNP
P.I. Institution Name:Western Kentucky University
Title:Director and Professor
[Research Presentation] Purpose: Determine the effects of the Patient Self-Determination Act (PSDA), patient age, and presence of a DNR order on the aggressiveness of nursing care for the end of life client. Methods: In 1989, just prior to the implementation of the PSDA, nurses working on the ICU and Oncology units of rural Midwestern hospitals were asked to respond to vignettes describing a terminally ill client. Using a factorial design, the effects of patient age, presence of a DNR order and nursing unit norms on the aggressiveness of nursing care were documented. In the follow-up arm of this study, the same vignettes were used to document the aggressiveness of nursing behavioral intentions for the care of end of life clients by nursing students and nurses working in a midsized Southeastern hospital.  Results: Contrary to results obtained in 1989, patient age and the presence of a DNR order did not significantly affect the aggressiveness of nursing care for the end of life client. However, the nursing care scores for today's nurses and nursing students were as high as or even higher than the aggressiveness of nursing behavioral intentions documented by nurses in 1989. Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, it does not appear that the PSDA has had a significant effect on decreasing nurses intentions to provide aggressive nursing care for the end of life client, even if the client is attempting to refuse certain nursing or medical procedures. This study has implications for increased teaching on end of life care, quality of life, and legal rights of patients to refuse nursing and medical care.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAggressiveness of Nursing Care Intentions for the End-of-Life Client: A 20-Year Follow-Up Studyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154149-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Aggressiveness of Nursing Care Intentions for the End-of-Life Client: A 20-Year Follow-Up Study</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bennett, Mary P., PhD, ARNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Western Kentucky University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Director and Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mary.bennett@wku.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Research Presentation] Purpose: Determine the effects of the Patient Self-Determination Act (PSDA), patient age, and presence of a DNR order on the aggressiveness of nursing care for the end of life client. Methods: In 1989, just prior to the implementation of the PSDA, nurses working on the ICU and Oncology units of rural Midwestern hospitals were asked to respond to vignettes describing a terminally ill client. Using a factorial design, the effects of patient age, presence of a DNR order and nursing unit norms on the aggressiveness of nursing care were documented. In the follow-up arm of this study, the same vignettes were used to document the aggressiveness of nursing behavioral intentions for the care of end of life clients by nursing students and nurses working in a midsized Southeastern hospital. &nbsp;Results: Contrary to results obtained in 1989, patient age and the presence of a DNR order did not significantly affect the aggressiveness of nursing care for the end of life client. However, the nursing care scores for today's nurses and nursing students were&nbsp;as high as or even higher than the aggressiveness of nursing behavioral intentions&nbsp;documented by nurses in 1989. Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, it does not appear that the PSDA has had a significant effect on decreasing nurses intentions to provide aggressive nursing care for the end of life client, even if the client is attempting to refuse certain nursing or medical procedures. This study has implications for increased teaching on end of life care, quality of life, and legal rights of patients to refuse nursing and medical care.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:46:50Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:46:50Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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