Birth Control Practices in a Unique Setting: Psychosocial Factors, Knowledge and Use

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154191
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Birth Control Practices in a Unique Setting: Psychosocial Factors, Knowledge and Use
Abstract:
Birth Control Practices in a Unique Setting: Psychosocial Factors, Knowledge and Use
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Farris, Lorinda, RN, BSN, MSN, WHCNP
P.I. Institution Name:U.S. Air Force, 31st Medical Group, Aviano Air Base, Italy
Title:Women's Health Care Nurse Practitioner, Major, U.S. Air Force Reserves
Co-Authors:Quincealea A. Brunk, RN, PhD
[Evidence-based Presentation] Objective: Current literature reports that approximately 48-50% of all pregnancies in the United States are unplanned. Studies further suggest that the primary reason for these unplanned pregnancies is a lack of access to healthcare, a lack of knowledge of birth control methods or a combination of these factors. In the U.S. military healthcare system, individuals on active duty and their dependents, have open access to free, local healthcare services, including a variety of reliable birth control methods. Yet, the rate of unplanned pregnancy in this population is as high as that of the general civilian population. Sample/Variables: The population of interest for this study was pregnant active duty military, activated reservists, and their spouses. A retrospective chart review was used to gather data on 112 obstetrical clients who received prenatal services from the Women's Health Clinic at Malcolm Grow Medical Center between January 1, 2004 and January 1, 2005. Methods: Each chart was assigned a code number. The researcher was the only individual to have access to the code numbers in a locked file system. All data are reported as aggregate and by code numbers only. Permission to conduct the study was obtained from the medical center IRB. Due to the process of chart reviews and thus, a lack of intervention, there was no need for individual consent forms. Theory/Implications: Findings of this study indicate that there are significant knowledge deficits and psychosocial factors contributing to the rate of unplanned pregnancies in the United States military. Implications for evidence-based nursing practice and policy development are extensive as findings from this study indicate that more psychosocial interventions and patient education are required to reduce the number of unplanned pregnancies or at least, improve the outcomes for healthy relationships during pregnancy and after birth.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBirth Control Practices in a Unique Setting: Psychosocial Factors, Knowledge and Useen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154191-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Birth Control Practices in a Unique Setting: Psychosocial Factors, Knowledge and Use</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Farris, Lorinda, RN, BSN, MSN, WHCNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">U.S. Air Force, 31st Medical Group, Aviano Air Base, Italy</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Women's Health Care Nurse Practitioner, Major, U.S. Air Force Reserves</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Rinnp@aol.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Quincealea A. Brunk, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Evidence-based Presentation] Objective: Current literature reports that approximately 48-50% of all pregnancies in the United States are unplanned. Studies further suggest that the primary reason for these unplanned pregnancies is a lack of access to healthcare, a lack of knowledge of birth control methods or a combination of these factors. In the U.S. military healthcare system, individuals on active duty and their dependents, have open access to free, local healthcare services, including a variety of reliable birth control methods. Yet, the rate of unplanned pregnancy in this population is as high as that of the general civilian population. Sample/Variables: The population of interest for this study was pregnant active duty military, activated reservists, and their spouses. A retrospective chart review was used to gather data on 112 obstetrical clients who received prenatal services from the Women's Health Clinic at Malcolm Grow Medical Center between January 1, 2004 and January 1, 2005. Methods: Each chart was assigned a code number. The researcher was the only individual to have access to the code numbers in a locked file system. All data are reported as aggregate and by code numbers only. Permission to conduct the study was obtained from the medical center IRB. Due to the process of chart reviews and thus, a lack of intervention, there was no need for individual consent forms. Theory/Implications: Findings of this study indicate that there are significant knowledge deficits and psychosocial factors contributing to the rate of unplanned pregnancies in the United States military. Implications for evidence-based nursing practice and policy development are extensive as findings from this study indicate that more psychosocial interventions and patient education are required to reduce the number of unplanned pregnancies or at least, improve the outcomes for healthy relationships during pregnancy and after birth.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:48:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:48:41Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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