The Buddy System: An Effective Intervention for Tobacco Cessation for Young Adults

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154207
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Buddy System: An Effective Intervention for Tobacco Cessation for Young Adults
Abstract:
The Buddy System: An Effective Intervention for Tobacco Cessation for Young Adults
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Hayes, Evelyn R., PhD, APRN, BC
P.I. Institution Name:University of Delaware
Title:Professor
Co-Authors:Leta P. Aljadir, MS, RD and Lisa Plowfield, PhD, RN
[Research Presentation] One of the fastest growing cohorts using tobacco is teens and young adults. The well-known risks, ongoing health education initiatives, and risk taking attitudes of this cohort make understanding of tobacco use complex.áEven more complex is developing effective cessation strategies for youth who already smoke cigarettes.áBased on the findings of Hayes and Plowfield's descriptive study indicating young adults' preferences for tobacco cessation programs, this study tested the effectiveness of the Buddy System, a peer support intervention, as a cessation strategy for young adults.áEach subject chose a peer "buddy" to help provide support, education, and encouragement for tobacco cessation.áUsing a pretest-posttest design, each subject provided a self report on numbers of cigarettes smoked during weekdays and week-ends at the beginning and upon completion of the study. In addition, subjects also completed a descriptive, informative survey about their experiences and beliefs related to smoking and tobacco cessation. In this sample (n=37) of college age adults (age range 18-24 years) who regularly smoked cigarettes,áthe number of cigarettes smoked during week-days significantly decreased when analyzed using the Wilcoxon signed ranks test( Z=(-2.76), p=.006).áNo statistically significant change occurred in number of cigarettes smoked during the week-ends.á Using thematic analysis to understand more of the complexities related to tobacco cessation, it became evident that cigarette smokers who decreased their use or stopped smoking, gained a greater understanding of personal triggers that caused them to "light up." The most common reason reported for smoking was stress related.áThose who decreased or quit smoking reported less frequently that smoking was a relaxing activity.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Buddy System: An Effective Intervention for Tobacco Cessation for Young Adultsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154207-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Buddy System: An Effective Intervention for Tobacco Cessation for Young Adults</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hayes, Evelyn R., PhD, APRN, BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Delaware</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">erhayes@udel.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Leta P. Aljadir, MS, RD and Lisa Plowfield, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Research Presentation] One of the fastest growing cohorts using tobacco is teens and young adults. The well-known risks, ongoing health education initiatives, and risk taking attitudes of this cohort make understanding of tobacco use complex.&aacute;Even more complex is developing effective cessation strategies for youth who already smoke cigarettes.&aacute;Based on the findings of Hayes and Plowfield's descriptive study indicating young adults' preferences for tobacco cessation programs, this study tested the effectiveness of the Buddy System, a peer support intervention, as a cessation strategy for young adults.&aacute;Each subject chose a peer &quot;buddy&quot; to help provide support, education, and encouragement for tobacco cessation.&aacute;Using a pretest-posttest design, each subject provided a self report on numbers of cigarettes smoked during weekdays and week-ends at the beginning and upon completion of the study. In addition, subjects also completed a descriptive, informative survey about their experiences and beliefs related to smoking and tobacco cessation. In this sample (n=37) of college age adults (age range 18-24 years) who regularly smoked cigarettes,&aacute;the number of cigarettes smoked during week-days significantly decreased when analyzed using the Wilcoxon signed ranks test( Z=(-2.76), p=.006).&aacute;No statistically significant change occurred in number of cigarettes smoked during the week-ends.&aacute; Using thematic analysis to understand more of the complexities related to tobacco cessation, it became evident that cigarette smokers who decreased their use or stopped smoking, gained a greater understanding of personal triggers that caused them to &quot;light up.&quot; The most common reason reported for smoking was stress related.&aacute;Those who decreased or quit smoking reported less frequently that smoking was a relaxing activity.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:49:23Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:49:23Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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