Coping and Long Term Physical Challenges of Adolescents Following Major Spinal Surgery

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154226
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Coping and Long Term Physical Challenges of Adolescents Following Major Spinal Surgery
Abstract:
Coping and Long Term Physical Challenges of Adolescents Following Major Spinal Surgery
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:LaMontagne, Lynda L., RN, DNSc
P.I. Institution Name:Vanderbilt University
Title:professor
Co-Authors:Michele H. Salisbury, RNC, PhD; Frances Cohen, PhD and Joseph T. Hepworth, PhD
[Research Presentation] Purpose:á Spinal fusion surgery to correct scoliosis in adolescents is an invasive operation followed by a long recovery. The physical challenges and complications adolescents face during recovery are not well understood. This study describes complications that occurred during a 9-month follow-up period and determines their association with coping strategies used. Method:á113 adolescents (mean age 13.9; 81% female; 84% Caucasian) were recruited prior to surgery. To assess avoidant-vigilant coping, following hospital discharge participants completed the Postoperative Coping Interview at 1, 3, and 6 months. Complications were assessed by chart reviews. Findings:áAnalysis revealed that 8.05% of patients had major complications during the nine months following surgery, including having to undergo a second surgery for instrumentation problems or intractable infection. Fifty-eight percent had a minor complication, for example, pain, general discomfort, or numbness in the upper and/or lower extremities. The incidence of pain was 12% at 1 month, 4% at 3 months and 22% at 9 months.áCoping was significantly associated with minor complications only at one time period: Vigilant copers at 3 months were less likely to have a minor or major complication at 3 months. However, the adolescents' use of vigilant coping did not remain stable over time. Discussion: These findings suggest that long term recovery from spinal surgery does not have a smooth trajectory.áThe finding that more participants complained of pain at nine months than at any other time period indicates that their lives still had not returned to normal and their pain needs were not being adequately met. Coping played a role only at 3 months: More vigilant copers had significantly fewer complications. Understanding the physical challenges adolescents face during recovery can help practitioners be more assiduous in assessment of complications during follow-up clinic visits and call attention to unmet pain needs that should be addressed.á
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCoping and Long Term Physical Challenges of Adolescents Following Major Spinal Surgeryen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154226-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Coping and Long Term Physical Challenges of Adolescents Following Major Spinal Surgery</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">LaMontagne, Lynda L., RN, DNSc</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Vanderbilt University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Lynda.LaMontagne@vanderbilt.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Michele H. Salisbury, RNC, PhD; Frances Cohen, PhD and Joseph T. Hepworth, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Research Presentation] Purpose:&aacute; Spinal fusion surgery to correct scoliosis in adolescents is an invasive operation followed by a long recovery. The physical challenges and complications adolescents face during recovery are not well understood. This study describes complications that occurred during a 9-month follow-up period and determines their association with coping strategies used. Method:&aacute;113 adolescents (mean age 13.9; 81% female; 84% Caucasian) were recruited prior to surgery. To assess avoidant-vigilant coping, following hospital discharge participants completed the Postoperative Coping Interview at 1, 3, and 6 months. Complications were assessed by chart reviews. Findings:&aacute;Analysis revealed that 8.05% of patients had major complications during the nine months following surgery, including having to undergo a second surgery for instrumentation problems or intractable infection. Fifty-eight percent had a minor complication, for example, pain, general discomfort, or numbness in the upper and/or lower extremities. The incidence of pain was 12% at 1 month, 4% at 3 months and 22% at 9 months.&aacute;Coping was significantly associated with minor complications only at one time period: Vigilant copers at 3 months were less likely to have a minor or major complication at 3 months. However, the adolescents' use of vigilant coping did not remain stable over time. Discussion: These findings suggest that long term recovery from spinal surgery does not have a smooth trajectory.&aacute;The finding that more participants complained of pain at nine months than at any other time period indicates that their lives still had not returned to normal and their pain needs were not being adequately met. Coping played a role only at 3 months: More vigilant copers had significantly fewer complications. Understanding the physical challenges adolescents face during recovery can help practitioners be more assiduous in assessment of complications during follow-up clinic visits and call attention to unmet pain needs that should be addressed.&aacute;</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:50:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:50:16Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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