Using Transformative Knowledge Translation to Advance Practice in a Transdisciplinary Environment

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154241
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Using Transformative Knowledge Translation to Advance Practice in a Transdisciplinary Environment
Abstract:
Using Transformative Knowledge Translation to Advance Practice in a Transdisciplinary Environment
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:McWilliam, Carol L., RN, MScN, EdD
P.I. Institution Name:The University of Western Ontario
Title:Professor
Co-Authors:Catherine Ward-Griffin, RN, MScN, PhD; Dorothy A. Forbes, RN, PhD; Mary Lou King, RN, PhD; Beverly D. Leipert, RN, BA, BSN, MSN, PhD; Karen Ferguson, RN, MScN and Abram Oudshoorn, RN, BScN
[Evidence-based Presentation] Nurses have been leaders in using multiple ways of knowing and acquiring research knowledge to advance practice, and therefore have much to contribute to advancing knowledge translation (KT) in a transdisciplinary environment. Defined as the exchange, synthesis and ethical application of knowledge within a complex system of relationships among researchers and users, KT is viewed not as a series of uni-linear actions, but as an on-going process. This conceptualization of KT expands its content beyond traditional notions of ôevidenceö to include clinically relevant ôhow toö knowledge and humanistic understanding attained through qualitative research. This paper presents a transdisciplinary KT project undertaken to promote the application of research findings on how to go about an empowering partnering approach that promotes health through care relationships. Drawing upon theories of transformative learning, organizational change and knowledge transfer, researchers applied participatory action research methods as a process-oriented, on-the job KT strategy, ultimately engaging 192 participants in: identifying opportunities and factors related to applying the research findings; formulating, implementing and assessing strategies for evidence-based practice; and institutionalizing and diffusing this change.á In a two-phase action cycle, health system policy/decision-makers and providers representing diverse disciplines participated in five 2-hour researcher-facilitated sessions and three months of self-directed strategy implementation (Phase 1); and, building on Phase 1 findings, a half-day workshop and an on-going extended 8-month self-directed strategy implementation with self-selected activities to institutionalize and diffuse the practice change (Phase 2). Baseline and end-of-phase measures (readiness for change; empowerment; partnering relations; health-promoting partnering effort) indicate progress toward readiness for change (p=.001) and partnering relations (p = .08). Qualitative findings from both phases afford insights into attitudinal, policy and behavioral barriers and strategies for achieving more effective KT. While further research is needed, findings suggest the potential of the transformative KT strategy and add new knowledge in this field.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUsing Transformative Knowledge Translation to Advance Practice in a Transdisciplinary Environmenten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154241-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Using Transformative Knowledge Translation to Advance Practice in a Transdisciplinary Environment</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">McWilliam, Carol L., RN, MScN, EdD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The University of Western Ontario</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cmcwill@uwo.ca</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Catherine Ward-Griffin, RN, MScN, PhD; Dorothy A. Forbes, RN, PhD; Mary Lou King, RN, PhD; Beverly D. Leipert, RN, BA, BSN, MSN, PhD; Karen Ferguson, RN, MScN and Abram Oudshoorn, RN, BScN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Evidence-based Presentation] Nurses have been leaders in using multiple ways of knowing and acquiring research knowledge to advance practice, and therefore have much to contribute to advancing knowledge translation (KT) in a transdisciplinary environment. Defined as the exchange, synthesis and ethical application of knowledge within a complex system of relationships among researchers and users, KT is viewed not as a series of uni-linear actions, but as an on-going process. This conceptualization of KT expands its content beyond traditional notions of &ocirc;evidence&ouml; to include clinically relevant &ocirc;how to&ouml; knowledge and humanistic understanding attained through qualitative research. This paper presents a transdisciplinary KT project undertaken to promote the application of research findings on how to go about an empowering partnering approach that promotes health through care relationships. Drawing upon theories of transformative learning, organizational change and knowledge transfer, researchers applied participatory action research methods as a process-oriented, on-the job KT strategy, ultimately engaging 192 participants in: identifying opportunities and factors related to applying the research findings; formulating, implementing and assessing strategies for evidence-based practice; and institutionalizing and diffusing this change.&aacute; In a two-phase action cycle, health system policy/decision-makers and providers representing diverse disciplines participated in five 2-hour researcher-facilitated sessions and three months of self-directed strategy implementation (Phase 1); and, building on Phase 1 findings, a half-day workshop and an on-going extended 8-month self-directed strategy implementation with self-selected activities to institutionalize and diffuse the practice change (Phase 2). Baseline and end-of-phase measures (readiness for change; empowerment; partnering relations; health-promoting partnering effort) indicate progress toward readiness for change (p=.001) and partnering relations (p = .08). Qualitative findings from both phases afford insights into attitudinal, policy and behavioral barriers and strategies for achieving more effective KT. While further research is needed, findings suggest the potential of the transformative KT strategy and add new knowledge in this field.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:50:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:50:57Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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