2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154251
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Learning Disaster Preparedness: A Journey from Fear to Quiet Competence
Abstract:
Learning Disaster Preparedness: A Journey from Fear to Quiet Competence
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Nix, Elizabeth, MSN, RN, ET, CDE
P.I. Institution Name:Arkansas State University
Title:Assistant Professor of Nursing
Co-Authors:Charlotte Young, RN, PhD
[Research Presentation] Background: Due to the shortage of nurses and the need to provide care for victims of disaster, many nurse educators are teaching disaster preparedness in colleges of nursing. Little is known about the motivation or process related to learning disaster preparedness. Objective: The aim of this descriptive phenomenologic study was to describe the essence of students' experiences of learning and changing perception related to course on psychological aspects of disaster. Methods: Descriptive Phenomenology was used highlight the experience of learning psychological aspects of disaster preparedness. The main recruitment approach was offering a free course on psychological aspects of disaster to juniors and seniors in the BSN program within the southern part of the USA. Convenience sampling was used and resulted in 15 students who identified themselves as having gained a different perspective due to the course. Participants were asked to describe their experience of changing perception during the course. Their stories were analyzed using Colaizzi's method of data analysis. Results: Student attitudes changed from efforts to avoid trauma to methods of recognizing and aiding persons experiencing trauma. áStudents described a learning process of: 1) feeling driven to learn how to protect self and family 2) gradually understanding the difference between stress and trauma, 3) learning methods of protecting self and others from the effects of trauma when possible and 4) methods of recognizing and aiding persons who have experienced trauma. One unexpected finding was studentsÆ identification of two factors motivating learning were: 1) a belief that disaster could happen to them in the futureá and 2) having a personal orá close relationship to theá suffering related toá psychological aspects of disaster or war. Conclusions: The importance of the motivation to learn is a pivotal element to consider when teaching students disaster preparedness. This has important implications for educating nurses in the future.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLearning Disaster Preparedness: A Journey from Fear to Quiet Competenceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154251-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Learning Disaster Preparedness: A Journey from Fear to Quiet Competence</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Nix, Elizabeth, MSN, RN, ET, CDE</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Arkansas State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">enix@astate.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Charlotte Young, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Research Presentation] Background: Due to the shortage of nurses and the need to provide care for victims of disaster, many nurse educators are teaching disaster preparedness in colleges of nursing. Little is known about the motivation or process related to learning disaster preparedness. Objective: The aim of this descriptive phenomenologic study was to describe the essence of students' experiences of learning and changing perception related to course on psychological aspects of disaster. Methods: Descriptive Phenomenology was used highlight the experience of learning psychological aspects of disaster preparedness. The main recruitment approach was offering a free course on psychological aspects of disaster to juniors and seniors in the BSN program within the southern part of the USA. Convenience sampling was used and resulted in 15 students who identified themselves as having gained a different perspective due to the course. Participants were asked to describe their experience of changing perception during the course. Their stories were analyzed using Colaizzi's method of data analysis. Results: Student attitudes changed from efforts to avoid trauma to methods of recognizing and aiding persons experiencing trauma. &aacute;Students described a learning process of: 1) feeling driven to learn how to protect self and family 2) gradually understanding the difference between stress and trauma, 3) learning methods of protecting self and others from the effects of trauma when possible and 4) methods of recognizing and aiding persons who have experienced trauma. One unexpected finding was students&AElig; identification of two factors motivating learning were: 1) a belief that disaster could happen to them in the future&aacute; and 2) having a personal or&aacute; close relationship to the&aacute; suffering related to&aacute; psychological aspects of disaster or war. Conclusions: The importance of the motivation to learn is a pivotal element to consider when teaching students disaster preparedness. This has important implications for educating nurses in the future.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:51:22Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:51:22Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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