Using evidence: Best practices for preparing undergraduate students for community nursing

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154255
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Using evidence: Best practices for preparing undergraduate students for community nursing
Abstract:
Using evidence: Best practices for preparing undergraduate students for community nursing
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Olinzock, Barbara J., RN, EdD
P.I. Institution Name:University of North Florida
Title:Assistant Professor in Nursing
[Symposium Presentation] The purpose of this session is to present key strategies that have been identified as essential for initiating and sustaining a homebase practice for preparing undergraduate nursing students for community nursing. Having institutional support, an empowered faculty, a solid integrated community-based curriculum, and willing community partners have all been overwhelmingly identified as critical factors in the evolution of the UNF Community Homebase Model. A faculty well versed in collaborative skills and consensus building is considered to at the heart of homebase practice. The role of community health faculty, as co-leaders mentoring and working directly along side of faulty transitioning from acute care settings to community work, is credited as a unique and invaluable part of homebase curriculum practice. Establishing a community-based curriculum team (CBCT) has proven an effective forum for group problem-solving, trouble-shooting, and the working through of logistical debacles. Involving community partners as co-educators has also been identified as a key strategy. Professional development activities, faculty-partner retreats, faculty-partner luncheons, and formal recognition of community service-learning projects are a few examples of strategies that have proven to be successful in building relationships and cultivating long-term community partnerships. Examples of practices that have proven successful in facilitating student engagement include on-going orientation, faculty and community partner support, and continuity of student homebase assignment over time. The contributions of homebase service-learning teams are well documented from its inception and the Community Homebase model is offered as a best practice for preparing nurses to participate in community-based care.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUsing evidence: Best practices for preparing undergraduate students for community nursingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154255-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Using evidence: Best practices for preparing undergraduate students for community nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Olinzock, Barbara J., RN, EdD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of North Florida</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor in Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">bolinzoc@unf.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Symposium Presentation] The purpose of this session is to present key strategies that have been identified as essential for initiating and sustaining a homebase practice for preparing undergraduate nursing students for community nursing. Having institutional support, an empowered faculty, a solid integrated community-based curriculum, and willing community partners have all been overwhelmingly identified as critical factors in the evolution of the UNF Community Homebase Model. A faculty well versed in collaborative skills and consensus building is considered to at the heart of homebase practice. The role of community health faculty, as co-leaders mentoring and working directly along side of faulty transitioning from acute care settings to community work, is credited as a unique and invaluable part of homebase curriculum practice. Establishing a community-based curriculum team (CBCT) has proven an effective forum for group problem-solving, trouble-shooting, and the working through of logistical debacles. Involving community partners as co-educators has also been identified as a key strategy. Professional development activities, faculty-partner retreats, faculty-partner luncheons, and formal recognition of community service-learning projects are a few examples of strategies that have proven to be successful in building relationships and cultivating long-term community partnerships. Examples of practices that have proven successful in facilitating student engagement include on-going orientation, faculty and community partner support, and continuity of student homebase assignment over time. The contributions of homebase service-learning teams are well documented from its inception and the Community Homebase model is offered as a best practice for preparing nurses to participate in community-based care.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:51:33Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:51:33Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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