2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154260
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Making Difficult Choices: When Breast Cancer Strikes Again
Abstract:
Making Difficult Choices: When Breast Cancer Strikes Again
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Pierce, Penny F., PhD, RN, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Michigan
Title:Associate Professor
[Research Presentation] Very little research has been devoted to understanding the decisional challenges women face when cancer returns to threaten their lives once more. It is not known if the decision making experience at the initial diagnosis supports or impairs the capacity to make decisions regarding recurrent disease. Further, it is not known if the occurrence of recurrent disease causes a detrimental post-decision appraisal such as guilt, remorse, or regret concerning the decisions made for early stage cancer. The purpose is to close the gaps in our knowledge regarding the decision making experiences, challenges, and frustrations of women when breast cancer recurs to develop tailored decision support interventions to enhance decision quality and psychological well being. Using a qualitative approach, the theoretically challenging task is to find an explanation that accounts for the relative ease with which some women make a complicated and serious medical decision, and the overwhelmingly difficult and stressful experience of others. Intensive face-to-face interviews with 50 women at the time of diagnosis provide an elaborated description of decision behavior when facing recurrent cancer. Using the constant comparative method, the analysis furthers our understanding of how the initial decision making process shapes the confrontation with decisions inherent in recurrent disease, and how it informs our understanding regarding hindsight bias, regret, decision satisfaction, and resilience in the face of this life-threatening disease. Analysis of these data reveal ways in which naturalistic (unaided) decision processes express optimistic bias (looking ahead) and hindsight bias (looking back). Narratives inform us of the ways in which decision making processes and cognitive biasing influences decisional quality and psychological coping. Clinically, it is important to understand the processes which lead women to select unnecessarily aggressive therapies or decline therapy altogether form a sense of despair rather than reasoned deliberation.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMaking Difficult Choices: When Breast Cancer Strikes Againen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154260-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Making Difficult Choices: When Breast Cancer Strikes Again</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Pierce, Penny F., PhD, RN, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Michigan</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">pfpierce@umich.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Research Presentation] Very little research has been devoted to understanding the decisional challenges women face when cancer returns to threaten their lives once more. It is not known if the decision making experience at the initial diagnosis supports or impairs the capacity to make decisions regarding recurrent disease. Further, it is not known if the occurrence of recurrent disease causes a detrimental post-decision appraisal such as guilt, remorse, or regret concerning the decisions made for early stage cancer. The purpose is to close the gaps in our knowledge regarding the decision making experiences, challenges, and frustrations of women when breast cancer recurs to develop tailored decision support interventions to enhance decision quality and psychological well being. Using a qualitative approach, the theoretically challenging task is to find an explanation that accounts for the relative ease with which some women make a complicated and serious medical decision, and the overwhelmingly difficult and stressful experience of others. Intensive face-to-face interviews with 50 women at the time of diagnosis provide an elaborated description of decision behavior when facing recurrent cancer. Using the constant comparative method, the analysis furthers our understanding of how the initial decision making process shapes the confrontation with decisions inherent in recurrent disease, and how it informs our understanding regarding hindsight bias, regret, decision satisfaction, and resilience in the face of this life-threatening disease. Analysis of these data reveal ways in which naturalistic (unaided) decision processes express optimistic bias (looking ahead) and hindsight bias (looking back). Narratives inform us of the ways in which decision making processes and cognitive biasing influences decisional quality and psychological coping. Clinically, it is important to understand the processes which lead women to select unnecessarily aggressive therapies or decline therapy altogether form a sense of despair rather than reasoned deliberation.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:51:46Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:51:46Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.