2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154267
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Medication Adherence in Older Adults
Abstract:
Medication Adherence in Older Adults
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Russell, Cynthia, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Missouri
Title:Assistant Professor
Co-Authors:Catherine Ashbaugh, MSN, RN; Vicki Conn, PhD, RN; Richard Madsen, PhD; Karen Hayes, PhD, APRN, BC, FNP, ACNP and Gilbert Ross, MD
[Research Presentation] Background: As chronic renal disease increases in those aged 60 and over, renal transplantation is concurrently increasing as a life-saving therapy that enhances quality of life, prolongs the lifespan, and reduces care costs. Renal transplantation in those aged 65 and older has risen from 3% in 1990 to 14% in 2006. Immunosuppressive medication adherence is crucial to survival of the transplant. Expensive, complex and persistent immunosuppressive regimens with undesirable side effects make medication adherence a challenge. Older renal transplant recipients are at additional risk for poor medication adherence due to cognitive and physical changes associated with aging. Purpose: This is the first descriptive, longitudinal study in older renal transplant recipients to empirically examine immunosuppressive medication adherence of two simultaneously scheduled, twice-daily immunosuppressive medications. Methods: Adherence to immunosuppressive medications was electronically monitored using the Medication Event Monitoring System (MEMS V) and a diary for 6 months in 12 renal transplant recipients aged 60 years or older. Results: Mean age was 65 years, 58% (n = 7) were females, and 83% (n = 10) were Caucasian. The most prevalent etiology of kidney disease was diabetes mellitus 41% (n = 5). Nine (75%) had received deceased donor kidney transplants. Monitored medications included cyclosporine 58% (n = 7) and tacrolimus 42% (n = 5). The median percent of prescribed doses taken on time was 83.90% (M = 67.84, SD = 34.10, range = 3.3-97.9). Seven (58%) of subjects achieved >/= 90% adherence to prescribed doses, two (17%) had 80-89% adherence, and three (25%) had <79% adherence. Implications/Future Research: Preliminary findings indicate that older renal transplant recipients are a sub-group at substantial risk for undesirable outcomes due to poor medication adherence. Future study of predictors and outcomes of immunosuppressive medication non-adherence in this growing population is warranted.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMedication Adherence in Older Adultsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154267-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Medication Adherence in Older Adults</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Russell, Cynthia, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Missouri</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">RussellC@health.missouri.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Catherine Ashbaugh, MSN, RN; Vicki Conn, PhD, RN; Richard Madsen, PhD; Karen Hayes, PhD, APRN, BC, FNP, ACNP and Gilbert Ross, MD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Research Presentation] Background: As chronic renal disease increases in those aged 60 and over, renal transplantation is concurrently increasing as a life-saving therapy that enhances quality of life, prolongs the lifespan, and reduces care costs. Renal transplantation in those aged 65 and older has risen from 3% in 1990 to 14% in 2006. Immunosuppressive medication adherence is crucial to survival of the transplant. Expensive, complex and persistent immunosuppressive regimens with undesirable side effects make medication adherence a challenge. Older renal transplant recipients are at additional risk for poor medication adherence due to cognitive and physical changes associated with aging. Purpose: This is the first descriptive, longitudinal study in older renal transplant recipients to empirically examine immunosuppressive medication adherence of two simultaneously scheduled, twice-daily immunosuppressive medications. Methods: Adherence to immunosuppressive medications was electronically monitored using the Medication Event Monitoring System (MEMS V) and a diary for 6 months in 12 renal transplant recipients aged 60 years or older. Results: Mean age was 65 years, 58% (n = 7) were females, and 83% (n = 10) were Caucasian. The most prevalent etiology of kidney disease was diabetes mellitus 41% (n = 5). Nine (75%) had received deceased donor kidney transplants. Monitored medications included cyclosporine 58% (n = 7) and tacrolimus 42% (n = 5). The median percent of prescribed doses taken on time was 83.90% (M = 67.84, SD = 34.10, range = 3.3-97.9). Seven (58%) of subjects achieved &gt;/= 90% adherence to prescribed doses, two (17%) had 80-89% adherence, and three (25%) had &lt;79% adherence. Implications/Future Research: Preliminary findings indicate that older renal transplant recipients are a sub-group at substantial risk for undesirable outcomes due to poor medication adherence. Future study of predictors and outcomes of immunosuppressive medication non-adherence in this growing population is warranted.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:52:06Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:52:06Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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