2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154289
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Depression during Recovery from Injury: The Fall After the Crash
Abstract:
Depression during Recovery from Injury: The Fall After the Crash
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Van Horn, Elizabeth R., PhD, RN, CCRN
P.I. Institution Name:The University of North Carolina at Greensboro
Title:Assistant Professor
[Research Presentation] Traumatic injury is a global health problem affecting 20 to 50 million individuals annually. Trauma patients experience multiple losses in physical, emotional, psychological, financial, social, occupational, and personal realms. Depression during recovery has been found to occur in greater than 30% of trauma patients and is associated with negative outcomes, including physical and psychological disability, delayed return to work, and loss of economic and social productivity. Research to date has not measured loss of resources and examined its effect on depressive symptoms early during recovery. A greater understanding of the types of losses experienced and their association with depression is needed to inform nursing interventions to prevent or manage depression during recovery from traumatic injury. The purposes of this study were to measure loss of resources experienced by trauma patients during recovery from traumatic injury and to examine the relationship between loss and depressive symptoms. The Conservation of Resources model guided this study. Using a cross-sectional design, a sample of 50 trauma patients recruited from two university medical center clinics participated in a single interview within four months of injury. Subjects completed measures of general health, resource loss, and depressive symptoms (CES-D). Data analysis included descriptive statistics, correlational, and t-tests analyses. Greater than half of the sample had CES-D scores equal to or greater than 16. Areas of greatest loss included personal transportation, stamina/endurance, independence, positive feelings towards self, goal accomplishment, and finances. Types of losses most strongly correlated with depressive symptoms were personal/attainment and financial resources. Narrative findings indicated subjects experienced negative changes in self-perception and interpersonal relationships. Management of resource loss and depression during recovery from traumatic injury requires a multidisciplinary approach. Interventions to prevent losses and promote access to additional support services to maximize recovery outcomes are needed. Future research to support the development of these interventions will be presented.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDepression during Recovery from Injury: The Fall After the Crashen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154289-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Depression during Recovery from Injury: The Fall After the Crash</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Van Horn, Elizabeth R., PhD, RN, CCRN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The University of North Carolina at Greensboro</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">e_vanhorn@uncg.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Research Presentation] Traumatic injury is a global health problem affecting 20 to 50 million individuals annually. Trauma patients experience multiple losses in physical, emotional, psychological, financial, social, occupational, and personal realms. Depression during recovery has been found to occur in greater than 30% of trauma patients and is associated with negative outcomes, including physical and psychological disability, delayed return to work, and loss of economic and social productivity. Research to date has not measured loss of resources and examined its effect on depressive symptoms early during recovery. A greater understanding of the types of losses experienced and their association with depression is needed to inform nursing interventions to prevent or manage depression during recovery from traumatic injury. The purposes of this study were to measure loss of resources experienced by trauma patients during recovery from traumatic injury and to examine the relationship between loss and depressive symptoms. The Conservation of Resources model guided this study. Using a cross-sectional design, a sample of 50 trauma patients recruited from two university medical center clinics participated in a single interview within four months of injury. Subjects completed measures of general health, resource loss, and depressive symptoms (CES-D). Data analysis included descriptive statistics, correlational, and t-tests analyses. Greater than half of the sample had CES-D scores equal to or greater than 16. Areas of greatest loss included personal transportation, stamina/endurance, independence, positive feelings towards self, goal accomplishment, and finances. Types of losses most strongly correlated with depressive symptoms were personal/attainment and financial resources. Narrative findings indicated subjects experienced negative changes in self-perception and interpersonal relationships. Management of resource loss and depression during recovery from traumatic injury requires a multidisciplinary approach. Interventions to prevent losses and promote access to additional support services to maximize recovery outcomes are needed. Future research to support the development of these interventions will be presented.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:53:06Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:53:06Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.