Use of Relaxing Music during Acute Recovery from Myocardial Infarction: Evidence-Based Implementation Guidelines

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154296
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Use of Relaxing Music during Acute Recovery from Myocardial Infarction: Evidence-Based Implementation Guidelines
Abstract:
Use of Relaxing Music during Acute Recovery from Myocardial Infarction: Evidence-Based Implementation Guidelines
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Winters, Jill M., PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Marquette University
Title:Director of Nursing Research and Scholarship, Associate Professor
Co-Authors:Susan E. Cashin, PhD
[Research Presentation] Background and Significance:áAcute myocardial infarction (AMI) remains the leading cause of death worldwide. Important predictors of morbidity and mortality in this population include diminished heart rate variability (HRV) and the extent of myocardial damage, and they are influenced by factors impacting myocardial oxygen (MVO2) supply and demand.áThe purpose of this randomized six-group experimental design study was to compare effectiveness of relaxing music, rest, and treatment as usual, for improving indicators of cardiac autonomic nervous system function and reducing anxiety, and to determine optimal timing and frequency for implementing relaxing music sessions. Methods: One hundred eighty AMI patients were randomly assigned to one of six groups. The six comparison groups included (1) music once per day (morning); (2 & 3) music twice per day (morning & afternoon; morning & evening); (4) music three times per day (morning, afternoon, & evening); (5) attention (rest); and (6) control (usual treatment). It was hypothesized that when compared with participants in the control and attention groups, individuals who listened to relaxing music would experience greater reductions in heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR), blood pressure (BP), MVO2 demand, and state anxiety, with concomitant increases in HRV. Results: Repeated measures analysis of variance was used to test differences in dependent variables after intervention sessions.áIndividuals who listened to relaxing music showed greater reductions in HR, RR, BP, MVO2 demand, and anxiety, with greater increases in HRV. Repeated measures general linear modeling was used to determine optimal timing and frequency of relaxing music sessions. Delivering relaxing music sessions two or three times per day was more beneficial than once per day, quiet rest, or treatment as usual. Conclusions: Relaxing music sessions promote both physiological and psychological relaxation responses during AMI recovery. These changes may potentially reduce the extent of ongoing myocardial injury and damage.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUse of Relaxing Music during Acute Recovery from Myocardial Infarction: Evidence-Based Implementation Guidelinesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154296-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Use of Relaxing Music during Acute Recovery from Myocardial Infarction: Evidence-Based Implementation Guidelines</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Winters, Jill M., PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Marquette University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Director of Nursing Research and Scholarship, Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jill.winters@marquette.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Susan E. Cashin, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Research Presentation] Background and Significance:&aacute;Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) remains the leading cause of death worldwide. Important predictors of morbidity and mortality in this population include diminished heart rate variability (HRV) and the extent of myocardial damage, and they are influenced by factors impacting myocardial oxygen (MVO2) supply and demand.&aacute;The purpose of this randomized six-group experimental design study was to compare effectiveness of relaxing music, rest, and treatment as usual, for improving indicators of cardiac autonomic nervous system function and reducing anxiety, and to determine optimal timing and frequency for implementing relaxing music sessions. Methods: One hundred eighty AMI patients were randomly assigned to one of six groups. The six comparison groups included (1) music once per day (morning); (2 &amp; 3) music twice per day (morning &amp; afternoon; morning &amp; evening); (4) music three times per day (morning, afternoon, &amp; evening); (5) attention (rest); and (6) control (usual treatment). It was hypothesized that when compared with participants in the control and attention groups, individuals who listened to relaxing music would experience greater reductions in heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR), blood pressure (BP), MVO2 demand, and state anxiety, with concomitant increases in HRV. Results: Repeated measures analysis of variance was used to test differences in dependent variables after intervention sessions.&aacute;Individuals who listened to relaxing music showed greater reductions in HR, RR, BP, MVO2 demand, and anxiety, with greater increases in HRV. Repeated measures general linear modeling was used to determine optimal timing and frequency of relaxing music sessions. Delivering relaxing music sessions two or three times per day was more beneficial than once per day, quiet rest, or treatment as usual. Conclusions: Relaxing music sessions promote both physiological and psychological relaxation responses during AMI recovery. These changes may potentially reduce the extent of ongoing myocardial injury and damage.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:53:24Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:53:24Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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