2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154308
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Evidence to Guide Best Practice with Overweight School Age Children
Abstract:
Evidence to Guide Best Practice with Overweight School Age Children
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Jacobson, Diana L., MS, RN, CPNP
P.I. Institution Name:Arizona State University
Title:Research Coordinator
Childhood overweight and at-risk for overweight has increased dramatically in the last decade. While the physical health consequences of childhood overweight often do not manifest until adolescence, adulthood or decades later, the negative psychosocial consequences of childhood overweight unfortunately begin to occur during the school-age years. Overweight children demonstrate lowered self-esteem (feelings of self-worth), depressive symptoms, and decreased social competence (peer acceptance and interaction).  Preventing and treating overweight in children and adolescents is a complex challenge for health care providers. In order to address the psychosocial ramifications of childhood overweight, intervention programs for the school-age child must address more than the intake of excessive calories and not expending enough energy through physical activity. Emotions and social adjustment are equally important. The National Institutes for Health has recommended that intervention research focus on developing interventions that consider the child?s developmental age, childhood susceptibility to obesity, and the complications of childhood obesity, such as psychosocial and mental health problems. Initiating overweight interventions at a younger age is recommended because younger children have had a shorter time to develop poor eating habits. The child may be more open to cognitive skill building, and early intervention will take advantage of the rapid growth and increasing lean body mass that are an ongoing growth process in the younger child. A summary of the best practice recommendations, based on the evidence, of the effects of overweight intervention programs on the school-age child?s psychosocial health will be presented. The most successful of these programs for children, have demonstrated modest improvements in physical and psychosocial health and behavior. Specifically, the most comprehensive of those intervention programs have emphasized building cognitive behavioral skills (problem solving, goal setting, self-monitoring, behavior modification, and knowledge attainment), collaboration with a parent, diet modification, and an increase in physical activity.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEvidence to Guide Best Practice with Overweight School Age Childrenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154308-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Evidence to Guide Best Practice with Overweight School Age Children</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Jacobson, Diana L., MS, RN, CPNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Arizona State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Research Coordinator</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">diana.jacobson@asu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Childhood overweight and at-risk for overweight has increased dramatically in the last decade. While the physical health consequences of childhood overweight often do not manifest until adolescence, adulthood or decades later, the negative psychosocial consequences of childhood overweight unfortunately begin to occur during the school-age years. Overweight children demonstrate lowered self-esteem (feelings of self-worth), depressive symptoms, and decreased social competence (peer acceptance and interaction). &nbsp;Preventing and treating overweight in children and adolescents is a complex challenge for health care providers. In order to address the psychosocial ramifications of childhood overweight, intervention programs for the school-age child must address more than the intake of excessive calories and not expending enough energy through physical activity. Emotions and social adjustment are equally important. The National Institutes for Health has recommended that intervention research focus on developing interventions that consider the child?s developmental age, childhood susceptibility to obesity, and the complications of childhood obesity, such as psychosocial and mental health problems. Initiating overweight interventions at a younger age is recommended because younger children have had a shorter time to develop poor eating habits. The child may be more open to cognitive skill building, and early intervention will take advantage of the rapid growth and increasing lean body mass that are an ongoing growth process in the younger child. A summary of the best practice recommendations, based on the evidence, of the effects of overweight intervention programs on the school-age child?s psychosocial health will be presented. The most successful of these programs for children, have demonstrated modest improvements in physical and psychosocial health and behavior. Specifically, the most comprehensive of those intervention programs have emphasized building cognitive behavioral skills (problem solving, goal setting, self-monitoring, behavior modification, and knowledge attainment), collaboration with a parent, diet modification, and an increase in physical activity.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:53:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:53:57Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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