Stress, Maternal Adaptation and Different Severities of Nausea and Vomiting: A Comparative Study in Taiwan

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154323
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Stress, Maternal Adaptation and Different Severities of Nausea and Vomiting: A Comparative Study in Taiwan
Abstract:
Stress, Maternal Adaptation and Different Severities of Nausea and Vomiting: A Comparative Study in Taiwan
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Kuo, Shih-Hsien, RPh, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Fooyin University
Title:Associate professor
Co-Authors:Fan-Hao Chou, RN, PhD
Pregnancy-related nausea and vomiting (NV) have a positive relationship with prenatal stress, yet few studies have addressed the relationship between the severities of NV and stress. The purpose of this study was to examine the differences among perceived stress, social support and maternal psychosocial adaptation in women with different severities (mild and less, moderate, and severe) of nausea and vomiting during pregnancy. A cross-sectional, correlational, and comparative research design was used. A convenience sample was recruited from prenatal clinics in southern Taiwan. Four measurement instruments were used in this study: the Index of Nausea, Vomiting, and Retching (INVR), the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS), the Interpersonal Support Evaluation List (ISEL), and the Prenatal Self-Evaluation Questionnaire (PSEQ). Based on the results of power analysis, a total of 150 pregnant women (the sample size of each group was 50) participated in this study. One-way ANOVA indicated that perceived stress was significantly different among the three groups. LSD posthoc test revealed that pregnant women with mild nausea and vomiting had significantly lower stress than did pregnant women with severe nausea and vomiting. Social support and maternal psychosocial adaptation were not significantly different among the three groups. Two-way ANOVA showed that severities of NV and planned/unplanned pregnancy had significant main effects on perceived stress; planned/unplanned pregnancy also had a significant main effect on MPA; age had significant main effects on perceived stress and social support. There were no significant interactions and other main effects between above variables. The findings of this study provide a more comprehensive understanding of the differences among perceived stress, social support, and maternal psychosocial adaptation in women who experience different severities of nausea and vomiting during pregnancy in the Taiwanese culture.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleStress, Maternal Adaptation and Different Severities of Nausea and Vomiting: A Comparative Study in Taiwanen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154323-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Stress, Maternal Adaptation and Different Severities of Nausea and Vomiting: A Comparative Study in Taiwan</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kuo, Shih-Hsien, RPh, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Fooyin University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sachem@ms5.hinet.net</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Fan-Hao Chou, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Pregnancy-related nausea and vomiting (NV) have a positive relationship with prenatal stress, yet few studies have addressed the relationship between the severities of NV and stress. The purpose of this study was to examine the differences among perceived stress, social support and maternal psychosocial adaptation in women with different severities (mild and less, moderate, and severe) of nausea and vomiting during pregnancy. A cross-sectional, correlational, and comparative research design was used. A convenience sample was recruited from prenatal clinics in southern Taiwan. Four measurement instruments were used in this study: the Index of Nausea, Vomiting, and Retching (INVR), the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS), the Interpersonal Support Evaluation List (ISEL), and the Prenatal Self-Evaluation Questionnaire (PSEQ). Based on the results of power analysis, a total of 150 pregnant women (the sample size of each group was 50) participated in this study. One-way ANOVA indicated that perceived stress was significantly different among the three groups. LSD posthoc test revealed that pregnant women with mild nausea and vomiting had significantly lower stress than did pregnant women with severe nausea and vomiting. Social support and maternal psychosocial adaptation were not significantly different among the three groups. Two-way ANOVA showed that severities of NV and planned/unplanned pregnancy had significant main effects on perceived stress; planned/unplanned pregnancy also had a significant main effect on MPA; age had significant main effects on perceived stress and social support. There were no significant interactions and other main effects between above variables. The findings of this study provide a more comprehensive understanding of the differences among perceived stress, social support, and maternal psychosocial adaptation in women who experience different severities of nausea and vomiting during pregnancy in the Taiwanese culture.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:54:39Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:54:39Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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