Exploring Outcomes and Patterned Responses to Afghan Refugee Women's Community Participation

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154335
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Exploring Outcomes and Patterned Responses to Afghan Refugee Women's Community Participation
Abstract:
Exploring Outcomes and Patterned Responses to Afghan Refugee Women's Community Participation
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Lindgren, Teri G., RN, MPH, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of California, San Francisco
Title:Postdoctoral Fellow
Community participation, a concept critical to the actualization of the Primary Health Care model, has long been integrated into health programs in developing countries and more recently in American public health nursing programs. It is seen as a cost-effective means to increase access and achieve sustainable heath promotion programs particularly in low income and ethnic communities. Yet there is limited research that has described the impact of participation on participants and their communities. The purpose of this study was to ethnographically examine community participation among Afghan refugee women living in the San Francisco Bay area and identify individual and community changes wrought by women?s long-term participation in their community using Transition Theory as a framework. This paper focuses on the pattern responses (outcomes) of participation at three levels: individual, organizational and community. Findings show that early participatory experiences encouraged Afghan women to form four active community based organizations (CBOs), which now provide a variety of culturally appropriate information-based and service oriented programs that directly benefit needy Afghans. ?Now we know? is an overarching theme that captures the way in which women addressed participation?s impact on their lives and their community.  Personal and community transitions are articulated along a not knowing/knowing continuum and learning is highly valued.  Learning is reflected in the building of networks and connections within and without the community, expanding foci of interest, development of public speaking and technological skills and in taking on politically and culturally sensitive community problems. Despite their participatory successes, participants identified four community level indicators that remain challenging: having and using resources, connecting to other communities, being united and working collaboratively. Implications for public health nursing include: assessing the needs and maintaining collaboration with existing CBOs, providing health and technical assistance, and sharing resources to achieve local community and public health goals.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleExploring Outcomes and Patterned Responses to Afghan Refugee Women's Community Participationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154335-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Exploring Outcomes and Patterned Responses to Afghan Refugee Women's Community Participation</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lindgren, Teri G., RN, MPH, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of California, San Francisco</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Postdoctoral Fellow</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">teri.lindgren@nursing.ucsf.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Community participation, a concept critical to the actualization of the Primary Health Care model, has long been integrated into health programs in developing countries and more recently in American public health nursing programs. It is seen as a cost-effective means to increase access and achieve sustainable heath promotion programs particularly in low income and ethnic communities. Yet there is limited research that has described the impact of participation on participants and their communities. The purpose of this study was to ethnographically examine community participation among Afghan refugee women living in the San Francisco Bay area and identify individual and community changes wrought by women?s long-term participation in their community using Transition Theory as a framework. This paper focuses on the pattern responses (outcomes) of participation at three levels: individual, organizational and community. Findings show that early participatory experiences encouraged Afghan women to form four active community based organizations (CBOs), which now provide a variety of culturally appropriate information-based and service oriented programs that directly benefit needy Afghans. ?Now we know? is an overarching theme that captures the way in which women addressed participation?s impact on their lives and their community.&nbsp; Personal and community transitions are articulated along a not knowing/knowing continuum and learning is highly valued.&nbsp; Learning is reflected in the building of networks and connections within and without the community, expanding foci of interest, development of public speaking and technological skills and in taking on politically and culturally sensitive community problems. Despite their participatory successes, participants identified four community level indicators that remain challenging: having and using resources, connecting to other communities, being united and working collaboratively. Implications for public health nursing include: assessing the needs and maintaining collaboration with existing CBOs, providing health and technical assistance, and sharing resources to achieve local community and public health goals.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:55:12Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:55:12Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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