2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154344
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Outcomes of Nurse Physician Collaboration Using an Infant Simulator
Abstract:
Outcomes of Nurse Physician Collaboration Using an Infant Simulator
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Messmer, Patricia R., PhD, RN, BC, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:Miami Children's Hospital
Title:Nurse Researcher
Introduction: IOM reported medical errors caused by systems problems and lack of teamwork contributed to excess mortalities in US hospitals (Kahn, 1999).  Evidence-based practice environment is enriched by complexity of multiple relationships requiring practitioners with excellent interpersonal skills, flexibility and ability to collaborate. Human patient simulators (HPS) can enhance Nurse-Physician (N-P) collaboration while evaluating competency and preventing errors (Bruce, 2003) Purpose was to assess competency, levels of collaborative N-P relationships, leader empowerment (LE), organization work satisfaction (OWS), nursing job satisfaction (NJS), and job stress (JS) using infant HPS. King?s (1981) perception, communication, interaction and transaction concepts served as Conceptual framework. Research design was a descriptive, correlational study using pretest/posttest design Research #1: What is the nature of nurse-physician team collaboration when using HPS as measured by Kramer/Schmalenberg?s (2002) N-P Scale (KSNPS), Group Cohesion (GC), Collaboration & Satisfaction about Patient Care Decisions (CSCD), LE, OWS, NJS, and JS instruments? #2: What is relationship between KSNPS and GC/CSCD and HPS competency? Participants- 17 Teams-50 nurses/50 medical residents (3-4 residents/3-4 nurses) were videotaped in 3 ?mock code? scenarios with debriefing. Outcomes: Mode age (28-32), 48% Hispanic, 35% Caucasian, 7% Afro-American; 62% female 38% males- KSNPS levels increased per scenario. Males had significant higher GC scores (F=4.94), significantly higher CSCD than females (F=8.35). Although teams perceived collaboration, it occurred over time - LE levels -moderate; OWS/NJS - moderate-high; JS moderate-low; no significant correlation between KSNPS, GC, CSCD, LE, OWS, NJS, JS and HPS scores. Discussion: 1st scenario communication occurred only between professions (silos); 2nd nurse/residents communicated with each other, evolving into ?working? teams; 3rd team more cohesive, communicated more effectively and genuinely listened to each other. Conclusions: Participants recognized deficiencies, attained keen assessment skills, enhanced team collaboration and reacted to crisis with expertise.  During the simulator study, no deaths were reported during ?Codes? on inpatient units.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleOutcomes of Nurse Physician Collaboration Using an Infant Simulatoren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154344-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Outcomes of Nurse Physician Collaboration Using an Infant Simulator</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Messmer, Patricia R., PhD, RN, BC, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Miami Children's Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nurse Researcher</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">patricia.messmer@mch.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Introduction: IOM reported medical errors caused by systems problems and lack of teamwork contributed to excess mortalities in US hospitals (Kahn, 1999). &nbsp;Evidence-based practice environment is enriched by complexity of multiple relationships requiring practitioners with excellent interpersonal skills, flexibility and ability to collaborate. Human patient simulators (HPS) can enhance Nurse-Physician (N-P) collaboration while evaluating competency and preventing errors (Bruce, 2003) Purpose was to assess competency, levels of collaborative N-P relationships, leader empowerment (LE), organization work satisfaction (OWS), nursing job satisfaction (NJS), and job stress (JS) using infant HPS. King?s (1981) perception, communication, interaction and transaction concepts served as Conceptual framework. Research design was a descriptive, correlational study using pretest/posttest design Research #1: What is the nature of nurse-physician team collaboration when using HPS as measured by Kramer/Schmalenberg?s (2002) N-P Scale (KSNPS), Group Cohesion (GC), Collaboration &amp; Satisfaction about Patient Care Decisions (CSCD), LE, OWS, NJS, and JS instruments? #2: What is relationship between KSNPS and GC/CSCD and HPS competency? Participants- 17 Teams-50 nurses/50 medical residents (3-4 residents/3-4 nurses) were videotaped in 3 ?mock code? scenarios with debriefing. Outcomes: Mode age (28-32), 48% Hispanic, 35% Caucasian, 7% Afro-American; 62% female 38% males- KSNPS levels increased per scenario. Males had significant higher GC scores (F=4.94), significantly higher CSCD than females (F=8.35). Although teams perceived collaboration, it occurred over time - LE levels -moderate; OWS/NJS - moderate-high; JS moderate-low; no significant correlation between KSNPS, GC, CSCD, LE, OWS, NJS, JS and HPS scores. Discussion: 1st scenario communication occurred only between professions (silos); 2nd nurse/residents communicated with each other, evolving into ?working? teams; 3rd team more cohesive, communicated more effectively and genuinely listened to each other. Conclusions: Participants recognized deficiencies, attained keen assessment skills, enhanced team collaboration and reacted to crisis with expertise. &nbsp;During the simulator study, no deaths were reported during ?Codes? on inpatient units.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:55:38Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:55:38Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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