2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154360
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Domestic Violence Screening in the Rural Emergency Department
Abstract:
Domestic Violence Screening in the Rural Emergency Department
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Poulin, Vickie, RN, ADN, SANE-A
P.I. Institution Name:Central Vermont Medical Center
Title:Research
Co-Authors:Jean Petersen, MHSA, BSN, RN; Sarah Jo Brown, PhD, RN
World-wide, 1.6 million people die each year as a result of domestic violence (DV) and many more are injured. Emergency Departments (EDs) are well positioned to improve the detection of domestic violence, however many have struggled with the most effective means of doing so, despite guidelines from several professional associations.  This was true in our community hospital where, like other rural hospitals, resources are scarce, numbers are few, and anonymity less assured than in EDs serving a larger population.  OBJECTIVE: This evidence-based practice project was undertaken to improve DV screening in the ED.  The two issues were: a) who should be screened, and b) how to phrase the questions to facilitate both detection and screener comfort. DESIGN OF THE CHANGE IN PRACTICE: Seven research studies of brief screening tools used in EDs were critically appraised and summarized.  Based on the research evidence, the decision was made to screen all women over age 13 and all men over age 65.  The screen consisted of one question, ?We ask all of our patient about domestic violence.  Are you safe in your current living situation, or is someone harming you in any way??   Eight months after changing the policy and the screening questions, data was obtained from retrospective review of medical records from all persons in the target population who presented at the Emergency Department during a one month period (n = 154).  RESULTS: Use of the DV Screening Tool increased screening from 65% to 93%.  In addition, detection of domestic violence was improved from  1%  to 3%, including four patients who presented with unrelated complaints.  CONCLUSION: Refinement of the DV policy and consistent use of a single question significantly increased both the screening rate and detection of domestic violence among women and elderly men in a rural population.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDomestic Violence Screening in the Rural Emergency Departmenten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154360-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Domestic Violence Screening in the Rural Emergency Department</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Poulin, Vickie, RN, ADN, SANE-A</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Central Vermont Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Research</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">yamallama@earthlink.net</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Jean Petersen, MHSA, BSN, RN; Sarah Jo Brown, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">World-wide, 1.6 million people die each year as a result of domestic violence (DV) and many more are injured. Emergency Departments (EDs) are well positioned to improve the detection of domestic violence, however many have struggled with the most effective means of doing so, despite guidelines from several professional associations.&nbsp; This was true in our community hospital where, like other rural hospitals, resources are scarce, numbers are few, and anonymity less assured than in EDs serving a larger population.&nbsp; OBJECTIVE: This evidence-based practice project was undertaken to improve DV screening in the ED.&nbsp; The two issues were: a) who should be screened, and b) how to phrase the questions to facilitate both detection and screener comfort. DESIGN OF THE CHANGE IN PRACTICE: Seven research studies of brief screening tools used in EDs were critically appraised and summarized.&nbsp; Based on the research evidence, the decision was made to screen all women over age 13 and all men over age 65.&nbsp; The screen consisted of one question, ?We ask all of our patient about domestic violence.&nbsp; Are you safe in your current living situation, or is someone harming you in any way??&nbsp;&nbsp; Eight months after changing the policy and the screening questions, data was obtained from retrospective review of medical records from all persons in the target population who presented at the Emergency Department during a one month period (n = 154).&nbsp; RESULTS: Use of the DV Screening Tool increased screening from 65% to 93%.&nbsp; In addition, detection of domestic violence was improved from&nbsp; 1%&nbsp; to 3%, including four patients who presented with unrelated complaints.&nbsp; CONCLUSION: Refinement of the DV policy and consistent use of a single question significantly increased both the screening rate and detection of domestic violence among women and elderly men in a rural population.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:56:19Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:56:19Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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