Adolescents' Perceived Needs of Community Interventions to Support Youth Exposed to Community Violence

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154370
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Adolescents' Perceived Needs of Community Interventions to Support Youth Exposed to Community Violence
Abstract:
Adolescents' Perceived Needs of Community Interventions to Support Youth Exposed to Community Violence
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:schiavone, deborah
Adolescents' perceived needs of community interventions to support youth exposed to community violence Inner city youths are at particular risk for violence. The social effects of violence have profound implications for adolescent identity development. The purpose of this study was to explore a means of community response to adolescents? perceived needs so that our youth can feel safe and worthwhile. Data collection was pursued to answer specific questions: (a) what do adolescents perceive as necessary to achieve a sense of wellbeing, (b) what community interventions do youth believe would support a feeling of safety, (c) what do adolescents think would contribute to creating a sense of continuity and predictability in their daily lives? These questions were explored through a qualitative research design. Data was obtained by having adolescents as active participants in focus groups. The adolescents were recruited through non-randomized sampling from an inner city community that has a high incidence of violence. The adolescents were between the ages of 18-21 since this age group is capable of abstracting life experiences with exposure to violence and has insight into their needs. Adolescents can be valuable informants in revealing weaknesses in community resources, and in offering their ideas for needed improvement. Data was collected using demographic questionnaires, written transcripts, and observations of oral dialogue during focus groups. Data was studied and analyzed to discover recurring themes using the constant comparative method (Strauss, 1994). Participation was strictly voluntary, and informed consent was required for all study participants. References: Strauss, A. (1994). Qualitative analysis for social scientists. New York: Cambridge University Press.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAdolescents' Perceived Needs of Community Interventions to Support Youth Exposed to Community Violenceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154370-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Adolescents' Perceived Needs of Community Interventions to Support Youth Exposed to Community Violence</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">schiavone, deborah</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">deborahschiavone@me.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Adolescents' perceived needs of community interventions to support youth exposed to community violence Inner city youths are at particular risk for violence. The social effects of violence have profound implications for adolescent identity development. The purpose of this study was to explore a means of community response to adolescents? perceived needs so that our youth can feel safe and worthwhile. Data collection was pursued to answer specific questions: (a) what do adolescents perceive as necessary to achieve a sense of wellbeing, (b) what community interventions do youth believe would support a feeling of safety, (c) what do adolescents think would contribute to creating a sense of continuity and predictability in their daily lives? These questions were explored through a qualitative research design. Data was obtained by having adolescents as active participants in focus groups. The adolescents were recruited through non-randomized sampling from an inner city community that has a high incidence of violence. The adolescents were between the ages of 18-21 since this age group is capable of abstracting life experiences with exposure to violence and has insight into their needs. Adolescents can be valuable informants in revealing weaknesses in community resources, and in offering their ideas for needed improvement. Data was collected using demographic questionnaires, written transcripts, and observations of oral dialogue during focus groups. Data was studied and analyzed to discover recurring themes using the constant comparative method (Strauss, 1994). Participation was strictly voluntary, and informed consent was required for all study participants. References: Strauss, A. (1994). Qualitative analysis for social scientists. New York: Cambridge University Press.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:56:46Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:56:46Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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