Determining the Validity and Reliability of Measures of Height, Weight, and Arm Span in a Spinal Cord Injured Patient Population

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154371
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Determining the Validity and Reliability of Measures of Height, Weight, and Arm Span in a Spinal Cord Injured Patient Population
Abstract:
Determining the Validity and Reliability of Measures of Height, Weight, and Arm Span in a Spinal Cord Injured Patient Population
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Schwallie, Deborah, RN, MS, BC
P.I. Institution Name:Milwaukee Veterans Administration Medical Center
Title:Nurse Practioner
Co-Authors:Christine Vandenhouten,
Background and Significance: Approximately 247,000 Americans are living with spinal cord injuries (SCI), and nearly 11,000 new cases occur annually.  Determining height and weight in a SCI population requires multiple personnel, significant effort, and introduces the potential for injury.  At each VA clinic and hospital admission, height and weight are recorded.  Self-reported height and weight are frequently accepted as a substitute for measurement.  Accuracy of self-reported height and weight when compared with measured height and weight is questionable.      Purpose:  The purpose of this exploratory study is to examine reliability of self-reported and measured height and weight and the concordance between arm span and height in a SCI population. Conceptual Framework:  The physical anthropometric framework guides this study, emphasizing accuracy of measurement techniques for calculating clinical indices used for identification and treatment of populations at risk for disease.   Sample:  A convenience sample of one hundred and ten SCI patients will provide adequate power for the study. Methods:  Self-report heights and weights, followed by actual measures of height, weight, and arm span will be collected.  Supine heights will be measured.  Arm span will be measured in participants? wheelchairs, with arms supported and extended, measuring from tip of right middle finger, across the chest, to tip of left middle finger.  Descriptive statistics will be used to report demographic data.  Pearson?s product moment correlation will be used to examine relationships between self-reported and actual measurements.  Dependent t-tests will be used to determine differences between BMI calculated using actual and reported measurements. Results:  Preliminary findings will be presented. Implications: If self-reported measurements of height and weight and/or arm span are as accurate as actual measures, there is a resultant reduction of injury risk for the SCI patient and time-savings for patient and staff.  This study was funded in part by Kappa Pi Sigma Theta Tau.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDetermining the Validity and Reliability of Measures of Height, Weight, and Arm Span in a Spinal Cord Injured Patient Populationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154371-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Determining the Validity and Reliability of Measures of Height, Weight, and Arm Span in a Spinal Cord Injured Patient Population</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Schwallie, Deborah, RN, MS, BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Milwaukee Veterans Administration Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nurse Practioner</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Deborah.Schwallie@med.va.gov</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Christine Vandenhouten,</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background and Significance: Approximately 247,000 Americans are living with spinal cord injuries (SCI), and nearly 11,000 new cases occur annually.&nbsp; Determining height and weight in a SCI population requires multiple personnel, significant effort, and introduces the potential for injury.&nbsp; At each VA clinic and hospital admission, height and weight are recorded.&nbsp; Self-reported height and weight are frequently accepted as a substitute for measurement.&nbsp; Accuracy of self-reported height and weight when compared with measured height and weight is questionable.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;Purpose:&nbsp; The purpose of this exploratory study is to examine reliability of self-reported and measured height and weight and the concordance between arm span and height in a SCI population.&nbsp;Conceptual Framework:&nbsp; The physical anthropometric framework guides this study, emphasizing accuracy of measurement techniques for calculating clinical indices used for identification and treatment of populations at risk for disease.&nbsp; &nbsp;Sample:&nbsp; A convenience sample of one hundred and ten SCI patients will provide adequate power for the study.&nbsp;Methods:&nbsp; Self-report heights and weights, followed by actual measures of height, weight, and arm span will be collected.&nbsp; Supine heights will be measured.&nbsp; Arm span will be measured in participants? wheelchairs, with arms supported and extended, measuring from tip of right middle finger, across the chest, to tip of left middle finger.&nbsp; Descriptive statistics will be used to report demographic data.&nbsp; Pearson?s product moment correlation will be used to examine relationships between self-reported and actual measurements.&nbsp; Dependent t-tests will be used to determine differences between BMI calculated using actual and reported measurements.&nbsp;Results:&nbsp; Preliminary findings will be presented.&nbsp;Implications: If self-reported measurements of height and weight and/or arm span are as accurate as actual measures, there is a resultant reduction of injury risk for the SCI patient and time-savings for patient and staff. &nbsp;This study was funded in part by Kappa Pi Sigma Theta Tau.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:56:49Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:56:49Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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