Preschoolers at Risk: An Evidence-Based Obesity Prevention Program for Young Children and Their Parents

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154376
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Preschoolers at Risk: An Evidence-Based Obesity Prevention Program for Young Children and Their Parents
Abstract:
Preschoolers at Risk: An Evidence-Based Obesity Prevention Program for Young Children and Their Parents
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Small, Leigh, PhD, RN, CPNP
P.I. Institution Name:Arizona State University College of Nursing
Title:Assistant Professor of Nursing and Coordinator, Pediatric Nurse Practitioner Program
Co-Authors:Bernadette Mazurek Melnyk, PhD, RN, CPNP/NPP, FAAN; Anne Strasser, RN, MS, PNP
Type II Diabetes is reaching epidemic proportions in America?s children. This is a direct consequence of the overwhelming numbers of children who are overweight/obese. Currently, it is estimated that 26-30% of all American children have a BMI>85% and are overweight or at risk for overweight. Preschoolers (3-6 years) whose BMI%>85% have a greater than 40% chance of being obese at age 25. One researcher found 60-90% of overweight children (5?10 years) to have at least one biochemical or clinical risk factor (e.g., hypertension) marking the early development of cardiovascular disease, a co-morbidity of overweight/obesity. This information underscores the pressing need to test prevention intervention programs with young children   The COPE/Healthy Children Program is a manualized, reproducible intervention developed from the best available evidence and has been recently pilot tested in two urban childcare centers (n=14). This unique program sought to strengthen parent/child knowledge; support positive intentions, attitudes, and beliefs; and provide examples of positive parenting and coping skills. Parent and child knowledge scores (i.e., healthy nutrition and activity) increased over the duration of the intervention period; however, the control group scores remained relatively unchanged. Additionally, the nutrition knowledge scores of the experimental mothers and their children were negatively correlated at baseline (r= -.18, p=.70) but became positively correlated over the course of the intervention program (r=.81, p=.03). Measures of parental beliefs and intentions to make healthy lifestyle decisions for their children also increased over time; however, parental intentions to make healthy lifestyle decisions for themselves showed little change. A major component of this prevention evidence-based intervention is the involvement of parents to model behavior for their young children; therefore, enhancement of the parent-directed portion of this intervention should improve knowledge and personal intention scores in future investigations while enhancing the parenting skills necessary to make healthy lifestyle behavior changes.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePreschoolers at Risk: An Evidence-Based Obesity Prevention Program for Young Children and Their Parentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154376-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Preschoolers at Risk: An Evidence-Based Obesity Prevention Program for Young Children and Their Parents</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Small, Leigh, PhD, RN, CPNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Arizona State University College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor of Nursing and Coordinator, Pediatric Nurse Practitioner Program</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">leigh.small@asu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Bernadette Mazurek Melnyk, PhD, RN, CPNP/NPP, FAAN; Anne Strasser, RN, MS, PNP</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Type II Diabetes is reaching epidemic proportions in America?s children. This is a direct consequence of the overwhelming numbers of children who are overweight/obese. Currently, it is estimated that 26-30% of all American children have a BMI&gt;85% and are overweight or at risk for overweight. Preschoolers (3-6 years) whose BMI%&gt;85% have a greater than 40% chance of being obese at age 25. One researcher found 60-90% of overweight children (5?10 years) to have at least one biochemical or clinical risk factor (e.g., hypertension) marking the early development of cardiovascular disease, a co-morbidity of overweight/obesity. This information underscores the pressing need to test prevention intervention programs with young children&nbsp;&nbsp; The COPE/Healthy Children Program is a manualized, reproducible intervention developed from the best available evidence and has been recently pilot tested in two urban childcare centers (n=14). This unique program sought to strengthen parent/child knowledge; support positive intentions, attitudes, and beliefs; and provide examples of positive parenting and coping skills. Parent and child knowledge scores (i.e., healthy nutrition and activity) increased over the duration of the intervention period; however, the control group scores remained relatively unchanged. Additionally, the nutrition knowledge scores of the experimental mothers and their children were negatively correlated at baseline (r= -.18, p=.70) but became positively correlated over the course of the intervention program (r=.81, p=.03). Measures of parental beliefs and intentions to make healthy lifestyle decisions for their children also increased over time; however, parental intentions to make healthy lifestyle decisions for themselves showed little change. A major component of this prevention evidence-based intervention is the involvement of parents to model behavior for their young children; therefore, enhancement of the parent-directed portion of this intervention should improve knowledge and personal intention scores in future investigations while enhancing the parenting skills necessary to make healthy lifestyle behavior changes.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:57:03Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:57:03Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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