Developing a Foundation for Building an Evidence-Based Protocol through a Rapid Cycle Process

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154388
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Developing a Foundation for Building an Evidence-Based Protocol through a Rapid Cycle Process
Abstract:
Developing a Foundation for Building an Evidence-Based Protocol through a Rapid Cycle Process
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Torres, Susan
Patient satisfaction with nursing care is one of many nurse-sensitive indicators collected to monitor quality of care at Meridian Health. When patient satisfaction with nursing care declines, it is important to understand the root cause and to set in motion a plan to correct or eliminate the basis of the problem. In October 2004, Model of Care (MOC) units at Meridian Health?s three Magnet hospitals experienced a significant decrease in patient satisfaction scores related to the item ?prompt response to call bell? in a standardized patient satisfaction survey, which prompted a call for focused attention to possible causes. The aims of this project were to: identify the nature of patient requests using the call bell; determine best practice interventions that could be implemented and sustained to anticipate patients? needs; and improve patient satisfaction through anticipatory nursing care, and thereby decreasing the need for call bell use. Planning sessions were conducted with the nurse managers, unit-based nurse educators, and nursing staff on three units to develop a tool to categorize reasons for call bell use, methodology, and a time frame for the project. The nursing staff conducted a 24-hour prevalence study to measure and consequently classify baseline call bell use. The most frequent requests were for positioning, pain medication, and assistance with toileting. Interventions developed through staff brainstorming sessions included rounds scheduled every two hours to assess patient needs and the environment, and anticipating patient need for pain medication prior to request. Three additional ?cycles? of prevalence study followed by targeted intervention initiation over a 12-month period resulted in a decline in both total call bell use and in ?predictable? call bell use. Results of this project provide a foundation for building evidence-based practice to improve current nursing practice, anticipate patient needs and improve patient satisfaction.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDeveloping a Foundation for Building an Evidence-Based Protocol through a Rapid Cycle Processen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154388-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Developing a Foundation for Building an Evidence-Based Protocol through a Rapid Cycle Process</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Torres, Susan</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">susan.torres@leememorial.org</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Patient satisfaction with nursing care is one of many nurse-sensitive indicators collected to monitor quality of care at Meridian Health. When patient satisfaction with nursing care declines, it is important to understand the root cause and to set in motion a plan to correct or eliminate the basis of the problem. In October 2004, Model of Care (MOC) units at Meridian Health?s three Magnet hospitals experienced a significant decrease in patient satisfaction scores related to the item ?prompt response to call bell? in a standardized patient satisfaction survey, which prompted a call for focused attention to possible causes. The aims of this project were to: identify the nature of patient requests using the call bell; determine best practice interventions that could be implemented and sustained to anticipate patients? needs; and improve patient satisfaction through anticipatory nursing care, and thereby decreasing the need for call bell use. Planning sessions were conducted with the nurse managers, unit-based nurse educators, and nursing staff on three units to develop a tool to categorize reasons for call bell use, methodology, and a time frame for the project. The nursing staff conducted a 24-hour prevalence study to measure and consequently classify baseline call bell use. The most frequent requests were for positioning, pain medication, and assistance with toileting. Interventions developed through staff brainstorming sessions included rounds scheduled every two hours to assess patient needs and the environment, and anticipating patient need for pain medication prior to request. Three additional ?cycles? of prevalence study followed by targeted intervention initiation over a 12-month period resulted in a decline in both total call bell use and in ?predictable? call bell use. Results of this project provide a foundation for building evidence-based practice to improve current nursing practice, anticipate patient needs and improve patient satisfaction.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T12:57:36Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T12:57:36Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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