2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154444
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Community-Dwelling Older Adults With Type II Diabetes and Depression
Abstract:
Community-Dwelling Older Adults With Type II Diabetes and Depression
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Tanner, Elizabeth Kay, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Johns Hopkins School of Nursing
Title:Associate Professor
The purpose of this study was to analyze the rate of depression and determine correlates and predictors of depression in community-dwelling older adults with type-2 diabetes. The study was a retrospective correlational design in which participants were interviewed in their homes. The sample consisted of 170 community-dwelling older adults with type-2 diabetes, the majority of whom were Medicaid recipients. The sample was predominately female (81 percent), and 35 percent were African-American. Ages ranged from 60-96, with a mean of 76. Data collection instruments were used to measure depression (GDS), loneliness, social support, co-morbidities, medications and activities of daily living (ADLs). The prevalence rate of depression was 45 percent (GDS score greater than 5). Eighty percent reported loneliness, and only nine percent reported that they were fully independent on activities of daily living; yet, 54 percent lived alone, and 42 per cent reported a lack of satisfaction with family support. Participants with co-morbidities were more likely to be depressed, although race and gender were not significant. Loneliness, functional limitations and low levels of social support contributed to depression in the multiple regression model and accounted for 29 percent of the variance. Covariate adjusted odds ratios suggest that older adults with type-2 diabetes and limitations in functional status, feelings of loneliness and lower satisfaction with family support are more likely to be depressed. Older adults with type-2 diabetes have high rates of functional limitations and are at much higher risk for depression, which compromises health outcomes. Therefore, performance on ADLs, satisfaction with family support, perceptions of loneliness and depression are all important areas of screening to include when managing type-2 diabetics within a community setting.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCommunity-Dwelling Older Adults With Type II Diabetes and Depressionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154444-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Community-Dwelling Older Adults With Type II Diabetes and Depression</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Tanner, Elizabeth Kay, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Johns Hopkins School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">etanner3@son.jhmi.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this study was to analyze the rate of depression and determine correlates and predictors of depression in community-dwelling older adults with type-2 diabetes. The study was a retrospective correlational design in which participants were interviewed in their homes. The sample consisted of 170 community-dwelling older adults with type-2 diabetes, the majority of whom were Medicaid recipients. The sample was predominately female (81 percent), and 35 percent were African-American. Ages ranged from 60-96, with a mean of 76. Data collection instruments were used to measure depression (GDS), loneliness, social support, co-morbidities, medications and activities of daily living (ADLs). The prevalence rate of depression was 45 percent (GDS score greater than 5). Eighty percent reported loneliness, and only nine percent reported that they were fully independent on activities of daily living; yet, 54 percent lived alone, and 42 per cent reported a lack of satisfaction with family support. Participants with co-morbidities were more likely to be depressed, although race and gender were not significant. Loneliness, functional limitations and low levels of social support contributed to depression in the multiple regression model and accounted for 29 percent of the variance. Covariate adjusted odds ratios suggest that older adults with type-2 diabetes and limitations in functional status, feelings of loneliness and lower satisfaction with family support are more likely to be depressed. Older adults with type-2 diabetes have high rates of functional limitations and are at much higher risk for depression, which compromises health outcomes. Therefore, performance on ADLs, satisfaction with family support, perceptions of loneliness and depression are all important areas of screening to include when managing type-2 diabetics within a community setting.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:00:12Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:00:12Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.