2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154448
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Using Techniques of Conversation Analysis to Recognize Collaboration
Abstract:
Using Techniques of Conversation Analysis to Recognize Collaboration
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Pierson, Charon, PhD, APRN, FAANP
P.I. Institution Name:University of Hawaii Department of Geriatric Medicine
Title:Assistant Professor
Purpose: The objective of this study is to examine collaborative interactions among professionals within the framework of ethnomethodology (EM) and conversation analysis (CA). Background: While collaboration in the health care arena is conceived of as a process for accomplishing a task, it is also a social process informed by the common sense, taken-for-granted, ôrulesö participants have for how people work together. These social aspects of collaboration are largely missing from the medical and nursing literature and are seen more clearly in the ethnomethodological literature. Collaboration as a foundational concept in EM and CA has its own meaning, which differs from the meaning of collaboration related to the process of accomplishing a task within a work setting. In studies of collaboration within distributed work environment, researchers have concluded that collaboration is a social process, as well as a communicative process, characterized by information sharing, knowledge integration, management, and co-working. Methods: Field notes and verbatim transcriptions of video- or audio-taped multidisciplinary professional interactions were analyzed to show the ways in which interactions were organized to produce collaboration in some instances and non-collaboration in others. Results: Membership categories and membership categorization devices are some of the ways participants are able to display and account for professional roles in a multidisciplinary setting. Certain features of interactions, such as the medical case presentation, create boundary objects that, despite their identification with a specific discipline, can facilitate collaboration across disciplines. Co-presence of participants is a powerful bodily gesture that is noted particularly by its absence; bodily presence indicates commitment to the process is interpreted as collaborative. Universal and active participation is highly valued by collaborators. Through the various turns-at-talk, participants uncover what others mean and what their joint actions or accounts come to mean within the context of the collaborative venture.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUsing Techniques of Conversation Analysis to Recognize Collaborationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154448-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Using Techniques of Conversation Analysis to Recognize Collaboration</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Pierson, Charon, PhD, APRN, FAANP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Hawaii Department of Geriatric Medicine</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">pierson@hawaii.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The objective of this study is to examine collaborative interactions among professionals within the framework of ethnomethodology (EM) and conversation analysis (CA). Background: While collaboration in the health care arena is conceived of as a process for accomplishing a task, it is also a social process informed by the common sense, taken-for-granted, &ocirc;rules&ouml; participants have for how people work together. These social aspects of collaboration are largely missing from the medical and nursing literature and are seen more clearly in the ethnomethodological literature. Collaboration as a foundational concept in EM and CA has its own meaning, which differs from the meaning of collaboration related to the process of accomplishing a task within a work setting. In studies of collaboration within distributed work environment, researchers have concluded that collaboration is a social process, as well as a communicative process, characterized by information sharing, knowledge integration, management, and co-working. Methods: Field notes and verbatim transcriptions of video- or audio-taped multidisciplinary professional interactions were analyzed to show the ways in which interactions were organized to produce collaboration in some instances and non-collaboration in others. Results: Membership categories and membership categorization devices are some of the ways participants are able to display and account for professional roles in a multidisciplinary setting. Certain features of interactions, such as the medical case presentation, create boundary objects that, despite their identification with a specific discipline, can facilitate collaboration across disciplines. Co-presence of participants is a powerful bodily gesture that is noted particularly by its absence; bodily presence indicates commitment to the process is interpreted as collaborative. Universal and active participation is highly valued by collaborators. Through the various turns-at-talk, participants uncover what others mean and what their joint actions or accounts come to mean within the context of the collaborative venture.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:00:24Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:00:24Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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