Health Related Hardiness and Psychosocial Adaptation in Individuals With Inherited Bleeding Disorders and Other Chronic Illnesses

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154463
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Health Related Hardiness and Psychosocial Adaptation in Individuals With Inherited Bleeding Disorders and Other Chronic Illnesses
Abstract:
Health Related Hardiness and Psychosocial Adaptation in Individuals With Inherited Bleeding Disorders and Other Chronic Illnesses
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Brooks, Mirella Vasquez, MSN, FNP, APRN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Hawaii at Manoa
Title:Nursing Instructor
An individual who is diagnosed with an inherited bleeding disorder is expected to manage their condition on a daily basis. This chronic situation can totally disrupt psychosocial functioning and make it more difficult to adjust to the illness. Other researchers have studied this phenomenon in various other chronic illnesses; however, not in individuals with inherited bleeding disorders (Akkasilpa, et al, 2000, Pollack, 1989a, 1989b). Psychosocial problems are not restricted to individuals with one chronic illness and clinically, it is noted that some individuals adjust to chronic diseases better than others. Individuals living with inherited bleeding disorders may also have other chronic illnesses such as hypertension, asthma, Diabetes mellitus (DM), Congestive Heart Failure (CHF), arthritis, and hepatitis A, B, C and/or HIV. The aims of this study are to describe health stressors, health related hardiness, perception of illness impact, self perception of health status and psychosocial adjustment to illness in individuals living with an inherited bleeding disorder; to determine relationships between health stressors, health related hardiness, perception of illness impact, self perception of health status and psychosocial adjustment to illness; determine if perception of illness impact has a direct and/or mediating effect on the relationship between health stressors, health related hardiness, and self-perception of health status and psychosocial adjustment to illness.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHealth Related Hardiness and Psychosocial Adaptation in Individuals With Inherited Bleeding Disorders and Other Chronic Illnessesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154463-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Health Related Hardiness and Psychosocial Adaptation in Individuals With Inherited Bleeding Disorders and Other Chronic Illnesses</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Brooks, Mirella Vasquez, MSN, FNP, APRN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Hawaii at Manoa</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nursing Instructor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">vasbro96@aol.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">An individual who is diagnosed with an inherited bleeding disorder is expected to manage their condition on a daily basis. This chronic situation can totally disrupt psychosocial functioning and make it more difficult to adjust to the illness. Other researchers have studied this phenomenon in various other chronic illnesses; however, not in individuals with inherited bleeding disorders (Akkasilpa, et al, 2000, Pollack, 1989a, 1989b). Psychosocial problems are not restricted to individuals with one chronic illness and clinically, it is noted that some individuals adjust to chronic diseases better than others. Individuals living with inherited bleeding disorders may also have other chronic illnesses such as hypertension, asthma, Diabetes mellitus (DM), Congestive Heart Failure (CHF), arthritis, and hepatitis A, B, C and/or HIV. The aims of this study are to describe health stressors, health related hardiness, perception of illness impact, self perception of health status and psychosocial adjustment to illness in individuals living with an inherited bleeding disorder; to determine relationships between health stressors, health related hardiness, perception of illness impact, self perception of health status and psychosocial adjustment to illness; determine if perception of illness impact has a direct and/or mediating effect on the relationship between health stressors, health related hardiness, and self-perception of health status and psychosocial adjustment to illness.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:01:09Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:01:09Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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