Parental Influences of Sexual Risk Behavior Among African American College Students

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154469
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Parental Influences of Sexual Risk Behavior Among African American College Students
Abstract:
Parental Influences of Sexual Risk Behavior Among African American College Students
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Hutchinson, M. Katherine, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Pennsylvania
Title:Assistant Professor
Co-Authors:Arlene Montgomery, PhD
Background: African Americans continue to be disproportionately affected by the HIV/AIDS epidemic. Rates for both men and women are significantly higher than those of their white non-Hispanics and Hispanic peers. Among adolescents and young adults, risk for HIV transmission is primarily through heterosexual risk behaviors. Data from the Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBSS) show that increasing numbers of youth are engaging in sexual intercourse at younger and younger ages; many have multiple partners by age 18. The majority of American youth experience sexual intercourse by age 18. Parents have been shown to be a significant influence of sexual risk behaviors among adolescents. Significant effects have been shown for both African American and white-non-Hispanic families. However, much of what we know about parental influences on the sexual risk behaviors of African American adolescents is based upon studies with inner-city youth and their families. The purpose of this study is to examine parental influences on the sexual risk behaviors of African American college freshman. Methods: The study employed a longitudinal two-wave design in which 400 African-American college freshman were surveyed during the fall semester. Participants will be surveyed again six months later (March-April, 2005). Using the family extension of the Theory of Planned Behavior, baseline (fall) data on family structure and processes (parent-child sexual communication, family closeness) and adolescent behavioral, normative, and control beliefs and intentions regarding sexual risk behaviors (intercourse and condom use) will be used to model sexual risk behaviors reported in the spring. OLS, logistic and Poisson regression models will be constructed to predict intentions, consistent condom use, and number of episodes of intercourse during follow-up. Findings: The psychometric properties of the Parent-Teen Sexual Risk Communication Scale will be described. The implications of the study findings for future research and intervention will be discussed.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleParental Influences of Sexual Risk Behavior Among African American College Studentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154469-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Parental Influences of Sexual Risk Behavior Among African American College Students</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hutchinson, M. Katherine, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Pennsylvania</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">khutchin@nursing.upenn.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Arlene Montgomery, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: African Americans continue to be disproportionately affected by the HIV/AIDS epidemic. Rates for both men and women are significantly higher than those of their white non-Hispanics and Hispanic peers. Among adolescents and young adults, risk for HIV transmission is primarily through heterosexual risk behaviors. Data from the Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBSS) show that increasing numbers of youth are engaging in sexual intercourse at younger and younger ages; many have multiple partners by age 18. The majority of American youth experience sexual intercourse by age 18. Parents have been shown to be a significant influence of sexual risk behaviors among adolescents. Significant effects have been shown for both African American and white-non-Hispanic families. However, much of what we know about parental influences on the sexual risk behaviors of African American adolescents is based upon studies with inner-city youth and their families. The purpose of this study is to examine parental influences on the sexual risk behaviors of African American college freshman. Methods: The study employed a longitudinal two-wave design in which 400 African-American college freshman were surveyed during the fall semester. Participants will be surveyed again six months later (March-April, 2005). Using the family extension of the Theory of Planned Behavior, baseline (fall) data on family structure and processes (parent-child sexual communication, family closeness) and adolescent behavioral, normative, and control beliefs and intentions regarding sexual risk behaviors (intercourse and condom use) will be used to model sexual risk behaviors reported in the spring. OLS, logistic and Poisson regression models will be constructed to predict intentions, consistent condom use, and number of episodes of intercourse during follow-up. Findings: The psychometric properties of the Parent-Teen Sexual Risk Communication Scale will be described. The implications of the study findings for future research and intervention will be discussed.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:01:25Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:01:25Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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