2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154484
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nursing Practice Challenges During Wartime and Peacekeeping Operations
Abstract:
Nursing Practice Challenges During Wartime and Peacekeeping Operations
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Agazio, Janice G., DNSc, CRNP, RN
P.I. Institution Name:The Catholic University of America
Title:Assistant Professor
Co-Authors:Norma J. Flaherty, RN, BSN
Purpose:  Today, the U. S. Army is performing a variety of missions that fall under the category of "Operations Other Than War (OOTW)" that includes peacekeeping and peace enforcement.  The purpose of this study was to describe, and generate a theoretical analysis of, nursing practice in operations other than war (OOTW) comparing multiple locations and wartime missions. The research question guiding this study was:  What is the practice of nursing by Army Nurse Corps officers in operations other than war (OOTW) compared to wartime nursing? Design: Using a descriptive qualitative design, this study was guided by the Army Nursing Practice conceptual model (Kennedy, Hill, Adams, & Jennings, 1996) and components of readiness (Reineck, 1999).   Methods: Seventy-seven Army Nurse Corps officers, both active duty and reserve component, consented to and participated in a one-time interview if they had completed a wartime or OOTW deployment. Qualitative data analysis as described by Miles and Huberman (1994) was used to simultaneously analyze and direct data collection.   Findings: Reported deployment sites for OOTW missions included Bosnia (39%), Honduras (24%), Kosovo (16%), Hungary (7%), and some individuals (=2%) in Columbia, Virgin Islands, Philippines, Guatemala, Haiti, Soto Cano, and Peru.  Wartime deployment locations included Iraq (72%), Kuwait (18%), Saudi Arabia (2%) and Afghanistan (2%) related to the current conflict.  Nurses recounted challenges and adjustments they needed to make in order to deliver high quality patient care to soldiers and civilian casualties and personal adaptation skills needed in adverse living and working conditions. Nursing Implications: By understanding the practice of nursing in OOTW and wartime, leadership can best prepare and train nurses to effectively function and care for patients in these challenging settings.  Findings will be useful for nurses caring for patients during natural disasters as conditions may mirror similar circumstances of adversity and patient care demands.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNursing Practice Challenges During Wartime and Peacekeeping Operationsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154484-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Nursing Practice Challenges During Wartime and Peacekeeping Operations</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Agazio, Janice G., DNSc, CRNP, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The Catholic University of America</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">agazio@cua.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Norma J. Flaherty, RN, BSN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose:  Today, the U. S. Army is performing a variety of missions that fall under the category of "Operations Other Than War (OOTW)" that includes peacekeeping and peace enforcement.  The purpose of this study was to describe, and generate a theoretical analysis of, nursing practice in operations other than war (OOTW) comparing multiple locations and wartime missions. The research question guiding this study was:  What is the practice of nursing by Army Nurse Corps officers in operations other than war (OOTW) compared to wartime nursing? Design: Using a descriptive qualitative design, this study was guided by the Army Nursing Practice conceptual model (Kennedy, Hill, Adams, & Jennings, 1996) and components of readiness (Reineck, 1999).   Methods: Seventy-seven Army Nurse Corps officers, both active duty and reserve component, consented to and participated in a one-time interview if they had completed a wartime or OOTW deployment. Qualitative data analysis as described by Miles and Huberman (1994) was used to simultaneously analyze and direct data collection.   Findings: Reported deployment sites for OOTW missions included Bosnia (39%), Honduras (24%), Kosovo (16%), Hungary (7%), and some individuals (=2%) in Columbia, Virgin Islands, Philippines, Guatemala, Haiti, Soto Cano, and Peru.  Wartime deployment locations included Iraq (72%), Kuwait (18%), Saudi Arabia (2%) and Afghanistan (2%) related to the current conflict.  Nurses recounted challenges and adjustments they needed to make in order to deliver high quality patient care to soldiers and civilian casualties and personal adaptation skills needed in adverse living and working conditions. Nursing Implications: By understanding the practice of nursing in OOTW and wartime, leadership can best prepare and train nurses to effectively function and care for patients in these challenging settings.  Findings will be useful for nurses caring for patients during natural disasters as conditions may mirror similar circumstances of adversity and patient care demands.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:02:09Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:02:09Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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