2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154488
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Qualitative Outcomes of Guided Imagery Following Joint Replacement Surgery
Abstract:
Qualitative Outcomes of Guided Imagery Following Joint Replacement Surgery
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Antall, Gloria F., ND, APRN, BC
P.I. Institution Name:Case Western Reserve University
Title:Assistant Professor
Co-Authors:Denise Kresevic, PhD, RN
The management of post-operative pain in elders is critical for advancing patient outcomes and improving the use of health care resources. Inadequate pain relief and adverse consequences of medications remain a significant concern for both patients and clinicians. Despite common side effects of opioid medications (current standard treatment) and compelling evidence that the addition of guided imagery (GI) is a safe intervention that decreases pain, anxiety and medication use, guided imagery remains underutilized as a complementary treatment for post-operative pain (Antall & Kresevic, 2004, Nilsson et al, 2001, Deisch et al, 2000, Daake & Gueldner, 1989,  Devine and Cook, 1986). For the current study, 102 joint replacement patients over the age of 50 years were recruited for a randomized trial to test the feasibility and efficacy of a guided imagery intervention. Subjects in the intervention group listened to an audiotape to promote guided imagery and relaxation. Subjects were requested to keep a journal during their 4 day postoperative course. This poster will present a qualitative analysis of a sub sample of patients who kept detailed journals about the lived experience of using guided imagery for pain management. The sub sample consisted of 12 subjects; 66% female, 75% Caucasian, 25% African-American. The mean age was 65.5 years. Average daily pain ratings ranged from 2.21-3.84, using the 0-10 pain scale. Average daily anxiety ratings ranged from 2-4, using a 0-4 scale. Journals entries were analyzed for content themes. Four major reoccurring themes emerged; Relaxation, the calming nature of the tapes, distraction and increased movement as a result of use of the tapes.  Further analysis of the total sample is underway. The use of guided imagery to promote relaxation and pain management is feasible and associated with positive patient outcomes.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleQualitative Outcomes of Guided Imagery Following Joint Replacement Surgeryen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154488-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Qualitative Outcomes of Guided Imagery Following Joint Replacement Surgery</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Antall, Gloria F., ND, APRN, BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Case Western Reserve University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">gloria.antall@case.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Denise Kresevic, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The management of post-operative pain in elders is critical for advancing patient outcomes and improving the use of health care resources. Inadequate pain relief and adverse consequences of medications remain a significant concern for both patients and clinicians. Despite common side effects of opioid medications (current standard treatment) and compelling evidence that the addition of guided imagery (GI) is a safe intervention that decreases pain, anxiety and medication use, guided imagery remains underutilized as a complementary treatment for post-operative pain (Antall &amp; Kresevic, 2004, Nilsson et al, 2001, Deisch et al, 2000, Daake &amp; Gueldner, 1989,&nbsp; Devine and Cook, 1986). For the current study, 102 joint replacement patients over the age of 50 years were recruited for a randomized trial to test the feasibility and efficacy of a guided imagery intervention. Subjects in the intervention group listened to an audiotape to promote guided imagery and relaxation. Subjects were requested to keep a journal during their 4 day postoperative course. This poster will present a qualitative analysis of a sub sample of patients who kept detailed journals about the lived experience of using guided imagery for pain management.&nbsp;The sub sample consisted of 12 subjects; 66% female, 75% Caucasian, 25% African-American. The mean age was 65.5 years. Average daily pain ratings ranged from 2.21-3.84, using the 0-10 pain scale. Average daily anxiety ratings ranged from 2-4, using a 0-4 scale. Journals entries were analyzed for content themes. Four major reoccurring themes emerged; Relaxation, the calming nature of the tapes, distraction and increased movement as a result of use of the tapes.&nbsp; Further analysis of the total sample is underway. The use of guided imagery to promote relaxation and pain management is feasible and associated with positive patient outcomes.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:02:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:02:20Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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