2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154506
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Examining the Quality of HIV/AIDS Interventions Focusing on Adolescents
Abstract:
Examining the Quality of HIV/AIDS Interventions Focusing on Adolescents
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Chen, Angela Chia-Chen, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Arizona State University
Title:Assistant Professor
Co-Authors:Tsai-Shan Shen, PhC
Adolescent sexual behavior is associated with many unwanted consequences that influence adolescent well-being. The effectiveness of interventions targeting adolescent sexual behavior, however, appears inconsistent. Systematic reviews of interventions are needed to fill gaps in knowledge and provide direction for future work. This paper presents results of quality assessment of interventions targeting adolescent risky sexual behavior.  Reports of interventions aimed at preventing HIV/STDs and pregnancy among adolescents aged 13?21 years were obtained from online databases, relevant journals, conference proceedings, and references cited in articles. Other selection criteria included randomized experimental design; published in 1994?2004; and reported in English. An assessment scale with 22 Likert-type items was developed to quantify scientific rigor in four categories: introduction, methodology, data analysis/result, and conclusion/recommendation. A numeric score was calculated for each category and the overall study. Two researchers rated each study independently. Coding discrepancies were resolved through discussion and consultation with a third researcher knowledgeable in the field.  After a careful review of primary studies from multiple sources, 10 studies that met all inclusion criteria were selected for quality assessment. Studies were excluded for the following reasons: different sample age range, nonrandomized design, no quantifiable data provided, and redundant study. The mean quality score was 2.79 (range 0-3; sd = .16). The category ?conclusion/recommendation? received the highest mean score (2.98), while ?methodology? received the lowest (2.63). Common methodology flaws included limited information about psychometric properties of instruments and about unit of intervention and analysis, and inadequate control of validity threats. Overall, the selected studies demonstrated high quality. Since prevention of risky sexual behavior is a top priority for promoting adolescent health, it is striking that so few rigorous studies have been done. Quality assessment should be included in systematic reviews (e.g., meta-analysis) to help minimize misleading results due to poor study quality.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleExamining the Quality of HIV/AIDS Interventions Focusing on Adolescentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154506-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Examining the Quality of HIV/AIDS Interventions Focusing on Adolescents</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Chen, Angela Chia-Chen, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Arizona State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">angela.ccchen@asu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Tsai-Shan Shen, PhC</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Adolescent sexual behavior is associated with many unwanted consequences that influence adolescent well-being. The effectiveness of interventions targeting adolescent sexual behavior, however, appears inconsistent. Systematic reviews of interventions are needed to fill gaps in knowledge and provide direction for future work. This paper presents results of quality assessment of interventions targeting adolescent risky sexual behavior.&nbsp; Reports of interventions aimed at preventing HIV/STDs and pregnancy among adolescents aged 13?21 years were obtained from online databases, relevant journals, conference proceedings, and references cited in articles. Other selection criteria included randomized experimental design; published in 1994?2004; and reported in English. An assessment scale with 22 Likert-type items was developed to quantify scientific rigor in four categories: introduction, methodology, data analysis/result, and conclusion/recommendation. A numeric score was calculated for each category and the overall study. Two researchers rated each study independently. Coding discrepancies were resolved through discussion and consultation with a third researcher knowledgeable in the field. &nbsp;After a careful review of primary studies from multiple sources, 10 studies that met all inclusion criteria were selected for quality assessment. Studies were excluded for the following reasons: different sample age range, nonrandomized design, no quantifiable data provided, and redundant study. The mean quality score was 2.79 (range 0-3; sd = .16). The category ?conclusion/recommendation? received the highest mean score (2.98), while ?methodology? received the lowest (2.63). Common methodology flaws included limited information about psychometric properties of instruments and about unit of intervention and analysis, and inadequate control of validity threats. Overall, the selected studies demonstrated high quality. Since prevention of risky sexual behavior is a top priority for promoting adolescent health, it is striking that so few rigorous studies have been done. Quality assessment should be included in systematic reviews (e.g., meta-analysis) to help minimize misleading results due to poor study quality.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:03:12Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:03:12Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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