2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154511
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Realism in Health Research: Tenets, Application and Utility
Abstract:
Realism in Health Research: Tenets, Application and Utility
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Clark, Alexander M., PhD, BA, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Alberta
Title:Assistant Professor
Co-Authors:Sue L. Lissel, MA
Realism is an approach to social theory originating from the social sciences but with recent application in economics, crime prevention and industrial development. However, its usage in health research has been comparatively low. We discuss the realist tradition and its orientation to positivism, constructivism and post-positivism. We then outline the main tenets of realism, these being: a stratified ontology, an approach emphasizing the importance of understanding complexity that invokes the interplay of structure and agency factors, and an explanatory focus on understanding phenomena occurring in dynamic open systems. To illustrate the appropriateness of realist approaches to health research, we finally draw on recent debate in relation to evidence-based health care, chronic disease management and randomized control trial research. Using these areas as exemplars in relation to a series of funded research projects, we will convey the contribution that realist-driven research can make guiding empirical and theoretical work in these areas of research priority.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRealism in Health Research: Tenets, Application and Utilityen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154511-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Realism in Health Research: Tenets, Application and Utility</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Clark, Alexander M., PhD, BA, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Alberta</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">alex.clark@ualberta.ca</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Sue L. Lissel, MA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Realism is an approach to social theory originating from the social sciences but with recent application in economics, crime prevention and industrial development. However, its usage in health research has been comparatively low. We discuss the realist tradition and its orientation to positivism, constructivism and post-positivism. We then outline the main tenets of realism, these being: a stratified ontology, an approach emphasizing the importance of understanding complexity that invokes the interplay of structure and agency factors, and an explanatory focus on understanding phenomena occurring in dynamic open systems. To illustrate the appropriateness of realist approaches to health research, we finally draw on recent debate in relation to evidence-based health care, chronic disease management and randomized control trial research. Using these areas as exemplars in relation to a series of funded research projects, we will convey the contribution that realist-driven research can make guiding empirical and theoretical work in these areas of research priority.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:03:26Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:03:26Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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