2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154515
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Facilitating Women's Utilization of Prenatal Care
Abstract:
Facilitating Women's Utilization of Prenatal Care
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Cooksey-James, Tawna, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Iowa
Title:Post-Doctorate Research Fellow
Within the United States Virgin Islands (USVI), a unique health care delivery system provides prenatal care with infant outcomes comparable to those of the United States (US). In 2001, while the IMR of 9.0 for the USVI was greater than the overall IMR of 6.9 for the US, the USVI IMR surpassed the IMR of five states and the District of Columbia. In the USVI, the government owns and operates its health care delivery system. Hence the legislature primarily directs subsidized U.S. federal monies received for health care toward its own hospitals and clinics and the people who need and use them, by funding Medicaid. And, since 1917, a formal focus on prenatal care began and was accompanied by local women being educated as nurse midwives. The continued funding of prenatal care coupled with this strong midwifery tradition continues to this day with midwives managing and delivering 80% of all infants. In this qualitative study, forty-two women who delivered at an island hospital signed letters of consent and were asked questions that focused on their perceived barriers to prenatal care utilization. Descriptive statistics of the demographic data indicated that the majority ethnicity and citizenship included 64.3% born and raised outside the USVI, 83.3% Caribbean, 88.1% Black, and 54.8% US citizens. Using Orem's Theory of Self-Care Deficits, interview data were placed into mutually exclusive categories of patient, system, and financial. Exemplars from the women for each of these categories are shared and provide evidence of their importance in the global quest to increase prenatal care utilization and decrease infant mortality. This study was partially funded by the Edward A. Dauer Scholarship Award and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Federal Nurse Traineeship Fund as implemented by the University of Miami, School of Nursing, Coral Gables, Florida.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFacilitating Women's Utilization of Prenatal Careen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154515-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Facilitating Women's Utilization of Prenatal Care</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Cooksey-James, Tawna, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Iowa</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Post-Doctorate Research Fellow</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">tawna-cooksey-james@uiowa.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Within the United States Virgin Islands (USVI), a unique health care delivery system provides prenatal care with infant outcomes comparable to those of the United States (US). In 2001, while the IMR of 9.0 for the USVI was greater than the overall IMR of 6.9 for the US, the USVI IMR surpassed the IMR of five states and the District of Columbia. In the USVI, the government owns and operates its health care delivery system. Hence the legislature primarily directs subsidized U.S. federal monies received for health care toward its own hospitals and clinics and the people who need and use them, by funding Medicaid. And, since 1917, a formal focus on prenatal care began and was accompanied by local women being educated as nurse midwives. The continued funding of prenatal care coupled with this strong midwifery tradition continues to this day with midwives managing and delivering 80% of all infants. In this qualitative study, forty-two women who delivered at an island hospital signed letters of consent and were asked questions that focused on their perceived barriers to prenatal care utilization. Descriptive statistics of the demographic data indicated that the majority ethnicity and citizenship included 64.3% born and raised outside the USVI, 83.3% Caribbean, 88.1% Black, and 54.8% US citizens. Using Orem's Theory of Self-Care Deficits, interview data were placed into mutually exclusive categories of patient, system, and financial. Exemplars from the women for each of these categories are shared and provide evidence of their importance in the global quest to increase prenatal care utilization and decrease infant mortality. This study was partially funded by the Edward A. Dauer Scholarship Award and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Federal Nurse Traineeship Fund as implemented by the University of Miami, School of Nursing, Coral Gables, Florida.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:03:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:03:37Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.