2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154521
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nursing Aphasia Assessment Tool
Abstract:
Nursing Aphasia Assessment Tool
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Denman, James, RN, BSN
P.I. Institution Name:UCDMC
Title:Clinical Resource Nurse
Co-Authors:Rosa Asad, RN; Raquel Resuello, RN, CNRN, ADN; Christine Davis, PhD; Bonnie Jean Raingruber, RN, PhD; Alicia Bengs, RN, BSN
Objectives: (1) To design a tool to improve communication between nurses and vulnerable patients with acute onset stroke who suffer from aphasia. (2) To help families communicate with their aphasic family member. (3) To conduct a survey regarding the effectiveness of the tool. Setting, Design, and Method: The research was conducted at a 500-bed, magnet-designated, university teaching hospital in northern California. In collaboration with a speech pathologist, we developed a tool and video to assess patients with aphasia. Nurses and families are given a handout to guide assessments and provide helpful communication hints. A Likert scale was used to evaluate the effectiveness of the tool. It was given to 50 nurses and 100 family members two weeks after they received training and had been using the tool. Concept Target: A tool using video, power point and an aphasia worksheet was designed to improve nurse, family, and patient communication. The tool walked the nurse through an aphasia assessment, first determining if the patient was fluent or non-fluent, then continuing to evaluate simple and more complex auditory processing followed by yes/no questions and word repetition testing. The training session provided video examples of patients with different types of aphasia shown during a speech pathologist?s assessment. Findings: Nurses reported the tool improved their assessment and communication skills. Conclusions: Knowledge from speech pathology can be integrated into nursing practice with use of the UCD Nursing Aphasia Assessment Tool. Implications: Nurses need practical ways to understand and treat aphasic patients. This became evident when we conducted a literature review. There was an absence of nursing research providing guidance-to-practice related to aphasia. The evidence-based tool we have developed is an effective way to improve quality of patient care and communication.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNursing Aphasia Assessment Toolen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154521-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Nursing Aphasia Assessment Tool</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Denman, James, RN, BSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">UCDMC</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Clinical Resource Nurse</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">James.denman@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Rosa Asad, RN; Raquel Resuello, RN, CNRN, ADN; Christine Davis, PhD; Bonnie Jean Raingruber, RN, PhD; Alicia Bengs, RN, BSN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objectives: (1) To design a tool to improve communication between nurses and vulnerable patients with acute onset stroke who suffer from aphasia. (2) To help families communicate with their aphasic family member. (3) To conduct a survey regarding the effectiveness of the tool. Setting, Design, and Method: The research was conducted at a 500-bed, magnet-designated, university teaching hospital in northern California. In collaboration with a speech pathologist, we developed a tool and video to assess patients with aphasia. Nurses and families are given a handout to guide assessments and provide helpful communication hints. A Likert scale was used to evaluate the effectiveness of the tool. It was given to 50 nurses and 100 family members two weeks after they received training and had been using the tool. Concept Target: A tool using video, power point and an aphasia worksheet was designed to improve nurse, family, and patient communication. The tool walked the nurse through an aphasia assessment, first determining if the patient was fluent or non-fluent, then continuing to evaluate simple and more complex auditory processing followed by yes/no questions and word repetition testing. The training session provided video examples of patients with different types of aphasia shown during a speech pathologist?s assessment. Findings: Nurses reported the tool improved their assessment and communication skills. Conclusions: Knowledge from speech pathology can be integrated into nursing practice with use of the UCD Nursing Aphasia Assessment Tool. Implications: Nurses need practical ways to understand and treat aphasic patients. This became evident when we conducted a literature review. There was an absence of nursing research providing guidance-to-practice related to aphasia. The evidence-based tool we have developed is an effective way to improve quality of patient care and communication.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:03:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:03:53Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.