2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154543
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Development of the Leadership Competency Checklist for Nurses
Abstract:
Development of the Leadership Competency Checklist for Nurses
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Grossman, Sheila Carey, APRN, FNP, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Fairfield University
Title:Professor & Nurse Practitioner
Development of The Leadership Competency Checklist for Nurses Purpose:  If there was ever a need for nurses to be creative, flexible, and able to empower others to also be flexible and creative, the time is now. With the universal nursing shortage, greater number of uninsured, changes in reimbursement, higher patient acuity, increase in global infectious diseases, highly diverse patient demographics, and the added challenges during the current terrorist environment, nurses need to be more effective leaders in health care. Delivering quality and cost effective patient outcomes have become the primary goals of all tasks accomplished by nurses. Consequently, just as nurses need to develop skills to perform nursing interventions, they must practice and attain leadership ability (Grossman & Valiga, 2005). Methodology: The Leadership Competency Checklist (Grossman, in press, 2006) was developed using the researcher?s clinical, administrative, and teaching expertise; data collected from conducting a concept analysis of leadership; information learned from developing a tool for assessing leadership development; and data obtained from a study that analyzed logs written by students in a leadership mentorship rotation. Content validity was established by two hospital level - three staff nurses. Findings: The Leadership Competency Checklist consists of nine categories [communication, collaboration, decision making, unit vision/research development, risk management, image & professional role, unit management, team building, and personal goals] with sub-objectives that allows the nurse/student to determine the skills and activities they need to gain leadership competency. Conclusion: Until the nursing profession realizes that nurses, from entry level to the chief executive, need leadership skills as much as patient care and management skills, patients will not receive optimum care in the present health care delivery system.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDevelopment of the Leadership Competency Checklist for Nursesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154543-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Development of the Leadership Competency Checklist for Nurses</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Grossman, Sheila Carey, APRN, FNP, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Fairfield University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor &amp; Nurse Practitioner</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Sgrossman@mail.fairfield.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Development of The Leadership Competency Checklist for Nurses Purpose:&nbsp; If there was ever a need for nurses to be creative, flexible, and able to empower others to also be flexible and creative, the time is now. With the universal nursing shortage, greater number of uninsured, changes in reimbursement, higher patient acuity, increase in global infectious diseases, highly diverse patient demographics, and the added challenges during the current terrorist environment, nurses need to be more effective leaders in health care. Delivering quality and cost effective patient outcomes have become the primary goals of all tasks accomplished by nurses. Consequently, just as nurses need to develop skills to perform nursing interventions, they must practice and attain leadership ability (Grossman &amp; Valiga, 2005). Methodology: The Leadership Competency Checklist (Grossman, in press, 2006) was developed using the researcher?s clinical, administrative, and teaching expertise; data collected from conducting a concept analysis of leadership; information learned from developing a tool for assessing leadership development; and data obtained from a study that analyzed logs written by students in a leadership mentorship rotation. Content validity was established by two hospital level - three staff nurses. Findings: The Leadership Competency Checklist consists of nine categories [communication, collaboration, decision making, unit vision/research development, risk management, image &amp; professional role, unit management, team building, and personal goals] with sub-objectives that allows the nurse/student to determine the skills and activities they need to gain leadership competency. Conclusion: Until the nursing profession realizes that nurses, from entry level to the chief executive, need leadership skills as much as patient care and management skills, patients will not receive optimum care in the present health care delivery system.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:04:56Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:04:56Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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