2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154555
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Patterns and Outcomes of Healthcare Use Among At-Risk Alcohol Drinkers
Abstract:
Patterns and Outcomes of Healthcare Use Among At-Risk Alcohol Drinkers
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Heise, Barbara A., APRN, BC
P.I. Institution Name:Brigham Young University
Title:Assistant Professor
Alcohol is the most common drug of abuse and a leading factor in the global burden of disease (Rehm, Room, Monteiro et al, 2003).  Alcohol consumption is associated with tobacco and illicit drug use as well as over 60 chronic health problems resulting in premature morbidity, disability and mortality (DeAlba, Samet, Saitz, 2004).  A gap exists between federal guidelines for low-risk alcohol use and when alcohol abuse/dependence is diagnosed. How this at-risk alcohol misuse group uses the healthcare system is relatively unknown.  This study examines the effects of at-risk alcohol use on patterns of healthcare use and health outcomes, and the effects of rural residence on these patterns and outcomes.   Methodology:  The National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) and the Medical Expenditures Panel Survey (MEPS) provided the data sources for this research. The NHIS allows identification of at-risk drinkers and the ability to follow these individuals over two years in the MEPS. The NHIS and MEPS databases provide information about healthcare utilization, access, and outcomes of healthcare use.  An exhaustive search of the literature revealed no studies examining at-risk alcohol use in these databases.  Findings: Preliminary findings reveal that At-Risk alcohol drinkers are most often between the ages of 24 -44, male, married, employed, and White. Rurality plays a role with the largest group of at-risk drinkers among rural residents. Rural drinkers had higher number of ED visits than their urban counterparts.  Total healthcare visits were highest among the at-risk group reporting 5+ drinks/day on 1-11 days per year.  Participants reporting drinking 5+ drinks/day on 12 or more days per year had the highest number of inpatient zero night hospital stays. Conclusion: Preliminary conclusions include the need for future research on and interventions for rural at-risk alcohol drinkers.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePatterns and Outcomes of Healthcare Use Among At-Risk Alcohol Drinkersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154555-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Patterns and Outcomes of Healthcare Use Among At-Risk Alcohol Drinkers</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Heise, Barbara A., APRN, BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Brigham Young University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">barbara-heise@byu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Alcohol is the most common drug of abuse and a leading factor in the global burden of disease (Rehm, Room, Monteiro et al, 2003).&nbsp; Alcohol consumption is associated with tobacco and illicit drug use as well as over 60 chronic health problems resulting in premature morbidity, disability and mortality (DeAlba, Samet, Saitz, 2004). &nbsp;A gap exists between federal guidelines for low-risk alcohol use and when alcohol abuse/dependence is diagnosed.&nbsp;How this at-risk alcohol misuse group uses the healthcare system is relatively unknown.&nbsp;&nbsp;This study examines the effects of at-risk alcohol use on patterns of healthcare use and health outcomes, and the effects of rural residence on these patterns and outcomes.&nbsp; &nbsp;Methodology: &nbsp;The National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) and the Medical Expenditures Panel Survey (MEPS) provided the data sources for this research. The NHIS allows identification of at-risk drinkers and the ability to follow these individuals over&nbsp;two years in the MEPS. The NHIS and MEPS databases provide information about healthcare utilization, access, and outcomes of healthcare use.&nbsp; An exhaustive search of the literature revealed no studies examining at-risk alcohol use in these databases.&nbsp; Findings: Preliminary findings reveal that At-Risk alcohol drinkers are most often between the ages of 24 -44, male, married, employed, and White. Rurality plays a role with the largest group of at-risk drinkers among rural residents. Rural drinkers had higher number of ED visits than their urban counterparts. &nbsp;Total healthcare visits were highest among the at-risk group reporting 5+ drinks/day on 1-11 days per year.&nbsp; Participants reporting drinking 5+ drinks/day on 12 or more days per year had the highest number of inpatient zero night hospital stays. Conclusion: Preliminary conclusions include the need for future research on and interventions for rural at-risk alcohol drinkers.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:05:30Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:05:30Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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